Archive for March, 2012



City Election Information

Sunday, March 25, 2012 at 9:40 AM

The City General Election will be held on Saturday, May 12, 2012 at City Hall, 11607 Eagle Drive, Mont Belvieu, Texas.

Positions on the May 12, 2012 Ballot are: 

Mayor

Position I

Position 2

Early Voting will be held as follows:

Monday, April 30, 2012 through Tuesday, May 8, 2012 during the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

There will be two (2) 12-hour days of early voting to be conducted on:

Tuesday, May 1    7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, May 8    7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Election Day:  Saturday, May 12, 2012 at City Hall 

POLLS OPEN AT 7:00 a.m. and CLOSE at 7:00 p.m.


LIBERTY COUNTY, Texas -

The search for a missing 2-year-old boy believed to have wandered into a wooded area in Liberty County turned into a recovery mission Thursday, officials said.

An Amber Alert was issued for Devon Davis on Tuesday. Liberty County sheriff’s deputies said Devon wandered off while his mother and 1-year-old sibling were napping at the their new home in the Sam Houston Lake Estates area near Tarkington about 3:30 p.m. She found the door open and the child gone.

The Davis family has only lived in their home a week. They moved to the area from Virginia.

Officials and volunteers from Liberty County and surrounding areas were searching by air, land and water. On Thursday morning, Liberty County officials said the search is now a recovery, meaning that they don’t expect to find the boy alive.

Capt. Rex Evans said he had to have a difficult talk with Devon’s parents Thursday morning.

“There is a negative end to this that you kind of have to prepare yourself for,” said Evans.

The Houston Police dive team and Texas EquuSearch joined the search Wednesday morning. Evans said waterways near the home have been searched and nothing was found. More areas of the waterways were searched on Thursday.

Texas EquuSearch has used sonar devices to look for Devon. 

“The problem with doing the sonar is there’s just so much debris underneath the water,” Texas EquuSearch founder Tim Miller said. “You get a false image and you have to go back over it two or three times to determine what it is.”

Miller said the terrain is difficult to search because of the woods, water, and wildlife. He said his volunteers have seen alligators, snakes, and wild boars. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents armed with rifles are standing on the banks while divers search the water to protect them from alligators.

Detectives said they have searched every building in a one-mile radius of the home without luck. The search was widened on Thursday.

Dozens of dogs were used to search the area for any signs of the boy.

Investigators have searched Devon’s home looking for clues, too.

Evans said Devon’s parents are heartbroken and have been cooperating in the investigation. Investigators said Devon’s mother took a short nap because she was simply exhausted, and Devon’s father was at work when his son disappeared.

Investigators said they do not suspect foul play. The FBI did have a personality expert on hand when a formal statement was taken from the parents as part of the normal investigative process.

Detectives are investigating the possibility that Devon let himself out of the home. The window in his second-story bedroom was open when he disappeared, but Evans said it has been ruled out that he got out of the home through it.

Miller said Devon’s parents asked to help with the search but weren’t allowed because no one knows what will be found.

“If I was honest with myself right now, I’d say we’re in recovery. I think that everybody involved agrees with that. But we’re holding onto that miracle,” added Miller. “We hope for that miracle that I truly believe is not going to happen.”

Crews said they will continue to search until they find Devon to help give the family closure.

Officials said there is no more need for civilian volunteers. However, water donations are needed because conditions are so harsh.

Devon is 30 inches tall and weighs 40 pounds with red hair and blue eyes. He was last seen wearing a red and gray jersey T-shirt, jeans and Spiderman tennis shoes.

Anyone with information regarding Devon’s whereabouts is asked to call the Liberty County Sheriff’s Office at 936-336-4500


From the 2010 ORWFD Dog Show!

Old River-Winfree Founders Day is searching for just the right person to Chair the Dog Show that was voted back in at the last Old River-Winfree Founders Day Team Meeting.

The perfect candidate would commit to organizing and soliciting dog owners to join in the fun filled event at the 2012 Old River-Winfree Founders Day October 12, 13, 2012.  The Dog Show is slated for Saturday.

Classes:  Small, Medium, and Large

Categories:  Talent Competition, Costume Contest, Best Personality, Cutest

Man’s Best Friend is allowed to enter one or all of the Categories.

Email info@orwfoundersday.com for information on this or other events.

New Officers for the 2012 Old River-Winfree Founders Day were also voted on and confirmed.  They are Colleen Fontenot – President; Jeanette Green – Vice President; Linda Johnson Murphy – Secretary/Treasurer. 

The City of Old River-Winfree has sponsored and supported Old River-Winfree Founders Day since 2008.

Jeanette Green was also awarded 2011 Old River-Winfree Founders Day “Volunteer of the Year” for her dedication, tenacity, spirit, and versatility!


Old River-Winfree has two Wal-Marts in close proximity;  Baytown and Liberty.  

NEW YORK –  Wal-Mart Stores Inc. (WMT) will lower grocery prices by $1 billion this year, hoping customers will come in for the reduced costs and then fan out to other parts of the store.

The retailer, the largest grocery retailer by sales in the U.S., is taking the step to continue or increase the progress its U.S. stores began to see in the second half of last year, when U.S. comparable-store sales turned positive. While the $1 billion sounds like a large number, Wal-Mart had $145 billion in grocery sales last year in the U.S. Wal-Mart calls the approach “investing in price,” which equates to reducing prices or not passing along the cost of inflation, so that the retailer’s margins will be dinged. The hope is that lower prices will generate enough additional customer traffic and loyalty to make up for the short-term sacrifice in profit.

Bernard Sosnick, retail analyst at Gilford Securities, said the $1 billion drop in prices is significant because groceries carry thin margins, and many other food chains would be hard pressed to make this kind of cut.

Traditional supermarkets like Kroger Co. (KR), Safeway Inc. (SWY) and Supervalu Inc. (SVU) have also “invested in price,” as food inflation runs high, while consumers are still extra conscious of their cash. The advantage Wal-mart has over those stores is that it can make up for any losses it takes in the food isles in higher margin departments like apparel.

Wal-Mart plans to lower prices in the food and consumables areas, with customers then heading to other parts of the store, like apparel and general merchandise, Chief Merchandising Officer Duncan Mac Naughton said at an industry conference.

Mac Naughton said initial progress the company saw in 2011 has continued into the retailer’s new fiscal year, which began in February and momentum has continued into March.

“Some key momentum is building inside Wal-Mart U.S.,” he said.

Supervalue and Safeway, meanwhile, have struggled lately to grow customer traffic and sales volumes, blaming overall economic headwinds. Kroger, which has been performing better, offers a different perspective. “Market share of traditional grocers, by whoever measures it, has been declining,” Kroger’s Chief Financial Officer Michael Schlotman said at a conference Wednesday, adding that his company is focused on growing their share of overall food consumption, not just traditional supermarket sales.

Safeway said it doesn’t comment on competition. Supervalue said its “hyper-local” strategy, which customizes food based on the community and uses locally sourced products, gives it an edge over competitors. “Some other retailers can’t localize their stores in this way,” a spokesman said.

But Mac Naughton said low prices remain a cornerstone, as customers continue to struggle with unemployment, rising gasoline prices and tepid economic growth. The executive didn’t specify what category or categories will see the price changes.

All the cost savings for customers will be funded by productivity improvements and expense savings, Mac Naughton said.

Still, the approach may squeeze suppliers of groceries to Wal-Mart, a group that already operates on thin margins.

Wal-Mart is the country’s biggest grocery store and growing. The retailer’s annual report, filed late Tuesday, shows groceries last year accounted for 55% of the namesake chain’s U.S. sales, compared with 53% a year earlier. Meanwhile, apparel sales slid another point to 7% as Wal-Mart has struggled trying to be thought of as a destination for things beyond basics.

Wal-Mart shares were recently up 0.03% $61.11, while Supervalu fell 5.4%, Safeway dropped 1.4% and Kroger was down 0.6%.


A RIVER FLOOD WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR THE TRINITY RIVER. …THE FLOOD WARNING CONTINUES FOR THE FOLLOWING RIVERS IN TEXAS… TRINITY RIVER NEAR MOSS BLUFF AFFECTING CHAMBERS AND LIBERTY COUNTIES …THE FLOOD WARNING CONTINUES FOR THE FOLLOWING RIVERS IN TEXAS.. TRINITY RIVER NEAR RIVERSIDE AFFECTING TRINITY AND WALKER COUNTIES TRINITY RIVER IN LIBERTY AFFECTING CHAMBERS AND LIBERTY COUNTIES THE FLOOD WARNING CONTINUES FOR THE TRINITY RIVER IN LIBERTY 
* FROM SATURDAY EVENING UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE…OR UNTIL THE WARNING IS CANCELLED. 

* AT 0815 PM WEDNESDAY THE STAGE WAS 24.2 FEET 

* MINOR FLOODING IS FORECAST. 

* FLOOD STAGE IS 26.0 FEET 

* FORECAST…RISE ABOVE FLOOD STAGE BY SATURDAY EVENING AND CONTINUE TO RISE TO NEAR 26.4 FEET BY MONDAY MORNING. ADDITIONAL RISES ARE POSSIBLE THEREAFTER. 

* AT 26.5 FEET…ROADS INTO SOME OUTLYING COMMUNITIES ABOVE THE GAGE CAN HAVE UP TO ONE FOOT OF WATER OVER THEM. && FLOOD OBSERVED FORECAST 6 PM LOCATION STAGE STAGE DAY TIME THU FRI SAT SUN TRINITY RIVER LIBERTY 26 24.2 WED 08 PM 24.9 25.5 26.0 26.3


Water Body Report
ALAN HENRY Water lightly stained; 64–68 degrees; 8.5’ low. Black are fair on swim jigs, Texas rigs and spinnerbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and prepared bait.
AMISTAD Water clear; 60–64 degrees; 20.26’ low. Black bass are good on jerkbaits, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, and soft plastics. White bass are good on slabs, white grubs, and small crankbaits. Striped bass are good on slabs, white grubs, and small crankbaits. Catfish are good on cheesebait, shrimp, and nightcrawlers under popping corks in 12–15 feet. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines and droplines baited with live perch. Everyone in a boat must have a Mexico fishing license (if fishing the Mexico side) whether fishing or not.
ARROWHEAD Water off color; 63–69 degrees; 8.01’ low. Black bass are fair on spinnerbaits, Rat–L–Traps, squarebill crankbaits and jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are good on Road Runners and minnows. Blue catfish are good on live shad.
ATHENS Water lightly stained, 60–65 degrees; 1.37’ low. Black bass are good on squarebill crankbaits and Texas rigged soft plastics. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on prepared bait.
BASTROP Water clear; 61–65 degrees. Black bass are fair on crankbaits and spinnerbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live bait, liver, and bloodbait. Yellow catfish are slow.
BELTON Water clear; 63–66 degrees; 6.04’ high. Black bass are excellent on spinnerbaits in coves, and soft plastics on the bottom. Hybrid striper are good on live shad early and late, and trolling Rat–L–Traps and chrome spinnerbaits. White bass are good trolling Rat–L–Traps and blue tube jigs. Crappie are very good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on stinkbait, doughbait, summer sausage, and hot dogs. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines and throwlines baited with live perch.
BOB SANDLIN Water stained; 60–66 degrees; 3.32’ low. Black bass are fair to good on soft plastics, spinnerbaits and shallow crankbaits. Crappie are good on live minnows and jigs. White bass are good on Humdingers. Catfish are fair to good on trotlines or juglines with Redneck’s Catfish Bait Soap.
BRAUNIG Water clear. Black bass are good on minnows and small spinnerbaits around structure. Striped bass are fair to good on chicken livers and minnows. Redfish are good on live perch and tilapia. Channel catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait. Blue catfish are fair on shrimp, stinkbait, and nightcrawlers. Yellow catfish are slow.
BRIDGEPORT Water stained; 60–65 degrees; 5.47’ low. Black bass are good on black neon soft plastics and bladed jigs around shallow cover. Good bite reported on Jackall ASKA 60 squarebills in TN Shad mid day along shallow points. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs (best action mid day). Channel catfish are fair on cut and prepared bait.
BROWNWOOD Water lightly stained; 57–61 degrees; 9.74’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse Bass Hogg spinnerbaits and jigs, craw colored crankbaits, and watermelon soft plastics. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on Li’l Fishies and minnows over brush piles. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow catfish are slow.
BUCHANAN Water clear; 59–63 degrees; 24.35’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse Curb’s jigs, black/blue JDC Skip–N–Pop topwaters, and wacky rigged watermelon Whacky Sticks in creeks and pockets. Striped bass are good drifting live bait and jigging chartreuse Curb’s bucktail jigs in 20–30 feet. White bass are good vertically jigging Pirk Minnows and red shad Tiny Traps near Paradise Point. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are good on juglines and trotlines baited with live bait.
CADDO Water stained; 61–66 degrees; 1.50’ high. Black bass are good on black/blue jigs and soft plastics around isolated cover. Shad pattern lipless crankbaits and spinnerbaits in the same areas are effective. White bass are fair on slabs. Yellow bass are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and prepared bait.
CALAVERAS Water clear. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastic worms and minnows around reed beds. Striped bass are good on shad and silver spoons. Redfish are good on perch and shrimp on the bottom. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, shad, and stinkbait.
CANYON LAKE Water clear; 58–62 degrees; 7.12’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon JDC grubs, green pumpkin Whacky Sticks on jigheads, and grape Scoundrel worms in 10–15 feet. Striped bass are fair vertically jigging green striper jigs and chrome Pirk Minnows. White bass are fair trolling shad and vertically jigging Pirk Minnows. Smallmouth bass are good on white Rat–L–Traps, root beer grubs, and watermelon Scoundrel worms in 8–18 feet. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on live bait.
CEDAR CREEK Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.08’ high. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, spinnerbaits and black/blue finesse jigs around main lake points and into the backs of creeks. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on live shad. Crappie are fair to good on minnows. Catfish are fair drifting cut shad.
CHOKE CANYON Water clear; 61–65 degrees; 12.51’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse Rat–L–Traps, crankbaits, and soft plastics. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on chartreuse tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on stinkbait and shrimp in 10–25 feet. Yellow catfish are slow.
COLEMAN Water clear; 57–61 degrees; 15.77’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastic worms and lizards, and on small crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on minnows and live shad. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are fair on shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow.
COLETO CREEK Water fairly clear; 2.00’ low. Black bass are good on crankbaits and spinnerbaits in 10–20 feet. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs in 10–12 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on trotlines baited with perch and nightcrawlers. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines baited with live perch.
COLORADO CITY 18.13’ low. No report available.
CONROE Water fairly clear; 60–64 degrees; 2.33’ low. Black bass are fair on black/blue spinnerbaits, crankbaits, and soft plastics in 10–20 feet. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are fair on bloodbait and shrimp.
COOPER Water lightly stained; 60–65 degrees; 1.61’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse shallow crankbaits and Texas rigged craw worms later in the day. Green pumpkin soft plastics are best. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair to good on Sassy Shad and live shad. Catfish are good on prepared bait and cut bait. Doctor’s Creek, Tira, and South Sulphur ramps are all open.
FAIRFIELD Fishing has been slow since the fish kill in September of 2010. TPWD has discontinued stocking the lake after another kill in early September 2011. Redfish and black bass survived the kill in limited numbers.
FALCON Water stained north, clear from marker 12 south; 66–70 degrees; 20.32’ low. Black bass are very good on watermelon red spinnerbaits, Brush Hogs, crankbaits, and magnum flukes. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are excellent on minnows and tube jigs under bridges. Channel and blue catfish are excellent on cut bait, especially in the upper end of the lake. Yellow catfish are slow. Everyone in a boat must have a Mexico fishing license (if fishing the Mexico side) whether fishing or not.
FAYETTE Water clear. Black bass are good on watermelon and chartreuse spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Channel and blue catfish are good on shad and shrimp over baited holes.
FORK Water stained; 61–66 degrees; 2.02’ low. Black bass are good on soft plastic baits. Shallow crankbaits on windy points are working well. Spawning fish are being reported on beds. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on cut shad and prepared bait.
FT. PHANTOM HILL Water clear; 65–69 degrees; 9.89’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, shallow running crankbaits, Rat–L–Traps and spinnerbaits. Crappie are fair on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on minnows and Rooster Tails. Catfish are fair on cut bait and nightcrawlers.
GIBBONS CREEK Water clear. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed Rat–L–Traps and soft plastics. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Catfish are good on hot dogs and frozen shrimp.
GRANBURY Water clear; 59–63 degrees; 0.28’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms with chartreuse tails. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait.
GRANGER Water murky; 60–64 degrees; 2.33’ high. Black bass are fair on black soft plastic worms and white spinnerbaits upriver. White bass are good on small white jigs and minnows upriver. Crappie are fair on minnows upriver at night. Blue catfish are good on prepared baits on rod & reel, and on juglines baited with Zote soap. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch.
GRAPEVINE Water lightly stained; 60–65 degrees; 5.85’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon Texas rigged worms, watermelon finesse jigs, spinnerbaits, and Jackall ASKA crankbaits along main lake points. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut shad. Due to high water some ramps are temporarily closed.
GREENBELT Water stained; 64–68 degrees; 37.96’ low. Black bass are fair on Senkos, spinnerbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on live and minnows. The Old Marina Point ramp is still open.
HOUSTON COUNTY Water stained; 66–70 degrees; 0.38’ high. Black bass to 9 pounds are excellent on watermelon red soft plastic worms near the marina in 5 feet, and on watermelon red lizards near Paradise Island in 4 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs around docks and brush. Red ear bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are very good on trotlines baited with beef hearts, cut shad, and chicken livers.
HUBBARD CREEK 65–69 degrees; 14.09’ low. Black bass are fair to good on jigs, finesse spinnerbaits, Texas rigs and shallow running crankbaits. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on stinkbait and nightcrawlers.
JOE POOL Water lightly stained; 60–65 degrees; 3.25’ high. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, spinnerbaits, and smaller jigs – mid–day bite has been best. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair to good on prepared baits.
LAKE O’ THE PINES Water lightly stained; 61–66 degrees; 0.62’ high. Black bass are good on Texas rigged worms, spinnerbaits and shallow crankbaits along main lake points. Isolated cover is the key. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on cut shad.
LAVON Water lightly stained; 60–65 degrees; 1.24’ high. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, black/brown jigs and squarebill crankbaits. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs around bridge columns. Catfish are good on cut shad and nightcrawlers.
LBJ Water clear; 59–63 degrees; 0.56’ low. Black bass are good on dark red Rat–L–Traps, watermelon/chartreuse soft plastics, and pumpkin topwaters in 10–20 feet. White bass are fair on Li’l Fishies and Shad Raps under birds. Crappie are fair on live minnows and blue Curb’s crappie jigs in 6–12 feet. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are fair on live bait.
LEWISVILLE Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 2.22’ high. Black bass are slow on shallow crankbaits and spinnerbaits along main lake points. Larger rock along main lake points producing as well. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and Sassy Shad. Catfish are good on prepared bait.
LIVINGSTON Water fairly clear; 64–68 degrees; 1.11’ high. Black bass are good on soft plastics and spinnerbaits. Striped bass to 9 pounds are fair on Zara spooks and live shad. White bass are fair on slabs and Rat–L–Traps. Crappie are very good on minnows. Blue catfish are very good on shad. Yellow catfish are slow.
MACKENZIE Water stained; 63–67 degrees; 86.47’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, wacky rigs, finesse jigs and chatterbaits. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. Ramp #1 is still open.
MARTIN CREEK Water fairly clear; 4.40’ low. No report available.
MEREDITH 98’ low. No report available.
MONTICELLO Water fairly clear; 78–88 degrees; 0.81’ high. Black bass are fair on squarebill crankbaits, weightless Senkos, chatterbaits and Texas rigged creature baits on shallow wood cover. The shallow bite is best early in the morning with occasional schooling reported. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on live shiners.
NASWORTHY No report available.
NAVARRO MILLS Water murky; 67–70 degrees; 8.61’ high. Black bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are fair on stinkbait. Blue catfish are good on cut shad. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch and goldfish. Lake record 54 pound blue catfish caught on rod & reel March 19.
O.H. IVIE Water stained; 66–71 degrees; 39.66’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Rat–L–Traps, Texas rigs, jigs and swim jigs. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair to good on tail spinners and live bait. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut bait.
OAK CREEK Water stained; 65–71 degrees; 14.71’ low. Black bass are fair to good on squarebill crankbaits, Texas rigs, spinnerbaits and wacky rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers.
PALESTINE Water stained; 61–65 degrees; 0.90’ high. Black bass are good on black and blue jigs, Texas rigged soft plastics and bladed jigs. The jig bite is consistent around docks that have deeper water as well as isolated cover along points. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs, Sassy Shad and live shad. White bass are fair to good on slabs and minnows. Catfish are good on prepared bait.
PALO DURO 47.13’ low. No report available.
POSSUM KINGDOM Water fairly clear; 66–70 degrees; 6.36’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and medium or shallow running crankbaits. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair to good on shiners and Road Runners. Striped bass are fair on live shad. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers.
PROCTOR Water fairly clear; 59–63 degrees; 1.20’ high. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastic worms and lizards. Striped bass are fair on green striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait. Yellow catfish are slow.
RAY HUBBARD Water lightly stained; 60–65 degrees; 0.08’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, squarebill crankbaits and medium crankbaits. Swim jigs are good around rip rap also. Crappie are fair on minnows and Road Runners. White bass are excellent on humps in 17–23 feet with hybrids mixed in. Catfish are good on prepared baits.
RAY ROBERTS Water stained; 60–64 degrees; 0.75’ high. Black bass are good on XCalibur XR50 rattle baits in Rayburn Red and chartreuse/white chatterbaits fished around shallow grass. Watermelon/red 6” YUM Dingers fished slow around outside edge of grass and standing timber is working well also. Crappie are good on minnows in backs of creeks. White bass are good on slabs in 25 feet of water on main lake ridges and some ridges toward the mouths of major creeks. Catfish are good around baited holes on Danny Kings punch bait.
RICHLAND CHAMBERS Water stained; 60–65 degrees; 0.44’ high. Black bass are good on creature baits around docks. Squarebill crankbaits are producing numbers as well. White bass are fair on slabs and live shad. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and live shad. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and nightcrawlers.
SAM RAYBURN Water lightly stained; 62–66 degrees; 1.97’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon Rat–L–Traps and crankbaits over grass on main lake flats. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Catfish are fair on doughbait and nightcrawlers.
SOMERVILLE Water murky; 62–65 degrees; 4.73’ high. Black bass are fair on chartreuse spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on minnows. White bass are slow. Crappie are good on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait. Yellow catfish are slow.
SPENCE 84’ low. No report available.
STAMFORD 3.45’ low. No report available.
STEINHAGEN 1.63’ high. No report available.
STILLHOUSE Water stained; 58–62 degrees; 4.00’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon soft plastics and chartreuse Super Flukes. White bass are fair on minnows in 10–20 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs in 10–20 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on minnows. Yellow catfish are slow.
SWEETWATER Water murky; 65–69 degrees; 14.23’ low. Black bass are fair on Senkos, Texas rigs, Rat–L–Traps and jigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and nightcrawlers.
TAWAKONI Water stained; 61–66 degrees; 0.45’ high. Black bass are good on black/blue Firewater 1/2oz. jigs and sun perch color chatter jigs. Crappie are fair on 1/16oz. curl tail grubs and small minnows on docks, bridge pilings and deep timber. White bass are excellent on white SSS Slabs and tailspins – schooling on points early and late. Striped bass and hybrid striper are good on 4” to 6” white or shad pattern Sassy Shad in the shallows early then suspending deep during the day – drifting live bait is also producing. Catfish are excellent in deep water drifting cut bait and fresh shad.
TEXOMA Water stained; 60–64 degrees; 2.02’ high. The Blue–Green Algae alert has been downgraded to an advisory. Bodily contact with water is no longer prohibited. It is now just discouraged. Please check http://www.swt.usace.army.mil/ prior to planning a trip to Texoma. Black bass are fair on spinnerbaits and medium crankbaits along main lake points. Striped bass and hybrid striper are good on slabs. No report on catfish.
TOLEDO BEND Water stained; 61–64 degrees; 0.77’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse/white crankbaits and soft plastics over grass off main lake points. Striped bass are fair on minnows. White bass are good on minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs over grass.
TRAVIS Water lightly stained; 62–66 degrees; 41.02’ low. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics and chartreuse Rat–L–Traps. Striped bass are fair on minnows. White bass are good on chartreuse spinnerbaits, minnows, and perch colored Rat–L–Traps in 10–25 feet. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs in 15–25 feet. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and fresh cut bait in 25–35 feet. Yellow catfish are slow.
WALTER E. LONG Water lightly stained. Black bass are fair on Rat–L–Traps and spinnerbaits. Hybrid striper are fair on silver striper jigs. White bass are good on slabs and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are good on stinkbait. Yellow catfish are slow.
WEATHERFORD Water stained; 60–65 degrees; 0.02’ high. Black bass are slow on shallow crankbaits and Texas rig creature baits – target any shallow cover. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs in. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and cut shad. White bass are fair on slabs and live minnows.
WHITE RIVER Water stained; 64–69 degrees; 25.23’ low. Black bass are fair on finesse jigs, Texas rigs, spinnerbaits and Rat–L–Traps. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and nightcrawlers.
WHITNEY Water stained; 58–62 degrees; 3.38’ high. Lake Whitney is currently experiencing a lake–wide fish kill event, caused by golden algae. The fish kill is reportedly affecting every species of fish, however the vast majority are non–game species. Anglers considering fishing Lake Whitney should be aware of this fish kill, and plan their trip accordingly. Additional information will be released as needed. Black bass are slow. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows. Catfish are slow.
WRIGHT PATMAN Water stained; 61–66 degrees; 10.54’ high. Black bass are good on Texas rigged worms, shallow crankbaits and chatterbaits along main lake points. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut shad and prepared bait.

Water Body Report
NORTH SABINE Trout are fair to good on the Louisiana shoreline on topwaters and Corkies. Flounder are fair on jigs tipped with shrimp around marsh drains.
SOUTH SABINE Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp. Trout are fair to good around Garrison Ridge and the Louisiana shoreline on topwaters and Corkies.
BOLIVAR Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on soft plastics and plugs. Black drum and redfish are good at Rollover Pass.
TRINITY BAY Trout are good for drifters working pods of shad and mullet on Bass Assassins, Trout Killers and Sand Eels. Catfish are good in the marsh on shrimp. Redfish are fair to good for waders around Rabbit Bayou and Red’s Bayou.
EAST GALVESTON BAY Trout are fair to good while drifting deep shell on plastics and live shrimp. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp. Black drum are fair to good in the Ship Channel on crabs.
WEST GALVESTON BAY Trout are fair to good for drifters working shell on live shrimp. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs. Redfish are good in the back lakes on shrimp and Gulps.
TEXAS CITY Black drum are good in are channel on crabs. Trout are fair on the reefs on live shrimp on the incoming tide.
FREEPORT Sand trout, speckled trout, black drum and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs in Christmas Bay. Black drum are good at the jetties on cracked blue crabs.
EAST MATAGORDA BAY Trout are fair for drifters in the back lakes on live shrimp. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet.
WEST MATAGORDA BAY Redfish are fair to good on the edge of Oyster Lake on shrimp and crabs. Black drum and redfish are fair to good at the jetty on crabs.
PORT O’CONNOR Trout and redfish are fair on soft plastics over soft mud. Trout and redfish are fair for drifters working the back lakes with live shrimp.
ROCKPORT Trout are fair to good in Morris–Cummings Cut on free–lined shrimp. Black drum are good in the Lydia Ann Channel on crabs. Redfish are good in the back of Allyn’s Bight on Gulps.
PORT ARANSAS Trout are fair on the East Flats on Gulps under a popping cork. Black drum are good in the Shrimpboat Channel on crabs and finger mullet. Redfish and sheepshead are fair to good at the jetty on shrimp.
CORPUS CHRISTI Trout are fair to good on the edge of the spoils on Gulps and live shrimp. Black drum and redfish are fair to good in the Packery Channel on crabs.
BAFFIN BAY Trout are good in the guts along the King Ranch shoreline on Corkies and topwaters. Black drum are good in the Land Cut on crabs. Trout are fair to good in the Land Cut on live shrimp.
PORT MANSFIELD Trout are fair to good on topwaters around sand and grass. Redfish are fair to good while drifting pot holes. Black drum and redfish are good on crabs at East Cut.
SOUTH PADRE Trout are good around the spoil islands, channel edges and color changes on DOA Shrimp in 3–4 feet of water. Black drum, redfish and sheepshead have taken at the jetty.
PORT ISABEL Trout and redfish are fair to good at Gas Well Flats on live shrimp. Redfish are fair at Mexiquita Flats and South Bay on DOA Shrimp and live shrimp.

The 20th annual Day ton Ole Tyme Days Fes tival will be held March 30, 31 and April 1, at the Dayton Community Center located at 801 S. Cleveland Street in Day ton.

Arts and crafts booths will now be indoors and outdoors. Festival events include: barbecue cook off, junior chili cookoff, carnival, arts and crafts, bake-off, car show, antique tractor show, Lil’ Mr. & Ms. Dayton Ole Tyme Days Pageant, and plenty of live music and great food!  

 

The Ole Tyme Days Festival is held annually to promote Dayton and to raise money for local youth scholarships.  Over $20,000 in scholarships were awarded last year to local graduating students.

Festival admission is free!  

All proceeds benefit the Dayton Ole Tyme Days Youth Scholarship Fund.  For more information, visitwww.oletymedays.com.


WASHINGTON, DC — Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott attended the third and final day of oral argument on the federal health care challenge before the U.S. Supreme Court, which focused on whether the law’s Medicaid expansion is constitutional, as well as whether all or only parts of the law will be void if the individual mandate is found to be unconstitutional. Attorney General Abbott had this to say about today’s oral argument:

On fighting Obamacare’s assault on liberty:

“The most important thing that we’ve been fighting for the past three days, as well as the past two years that this lawsuit has been going on, is fighting for the individual liberty of all Americans, fighting for the free enterprise system for employers large and small, and fighting for the state sovereignty for the State of Texas. I think today, the last three days and the last two years, we’ve gone a long way of achieving just that.”

On what’s next:

“We’re now waiting for the United States Supreme Court decision to come out. I anticipate it coming out at the end of June. Right now, based upon all the comments I’m hearing from the court, I’m anticipating a very favorable resolution of this case in favor of the State of Texas and in favor of the taxpayers of this state.”

Media links

Sound bites from Attorney General Greg Abbott

Attorney General Abbott’s comments on the final day of oral arguments
Attorney General Abbott’s comments on fighting Obamacare’s assault on liberty
Attorney General Abbott’s comments on what’s next

Supreme Court link to transcript and audio of today’s oral arguments

FOR OTHER ITEMS ASSOCIATED WITH ATTORNEY GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS, ACCESS OAG NEWS RELEASES ONLINE AT WWW.TEXASATTORNEYGENERAL.GOV


Wednesday, March 28, 2012  •  Austin, Texas  •  Press Release

Gov. Rick Perry today issued the following statement regarding a ruling by the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) disapproval of TCEQ’s Pollution Control Project Standard Permit. The court ruling directs the EPA to quickly reconsider its disapproval, after determining that the EPA acted “arbitrarily and capriciously”:

“Texas has long maintained the EPA is vastly overreaching in unchecked efforts to seize control of matters that are best left to the states. Our state has developed a system that protects the environment and promotes a nationally-leading business climate that generates investment and creates jobs. We remain confident that when it’s all said and done, the EPA’s actions in this case will be just another example of failed federal overreach.”

The Obama Administration disapproved one component of Texas’ standard permits in 2010. The state’s entire standard permits program had been approved by the Bush Administration in 2003. The court’s ruling affirmed that while air quality standards are set by the federal Clean Air Act, each state has the right to implement its own processes to achieve those standards, and that the EPA clearly overstepped the boundaries of the Clean Air Act in disapproving Texas’ submission.


Image of existing Brine Ponds in Mont Belvieu

Read about the Mont Belvieu Salt Dome

A common practice of applying for a permit to expand a Mont Belvieu business was met with a very uncommon response by local residents of a mobile home park who want to be assured their quality of life won’t be affected.

Targa Resources, a provider of liquid and natural gas, received an approval from the Railroad Commission to build two 800-foot by 600 -foot brine ponds on 55 acres of company-owned property located adjacent to Warren Road in Mont Belvieu. 

At least 30 residents of a nearby mobile home park attended a city council meeting to oppose the request Monday night.

Phil Applegate of Targa explained that the brine ponds were a necessary part of the liquid gas storage operation. As the storage units fill up, brine, a simple mixture of water saturated with salt, is pulled from the gas storage tanks and flushed through a gas extrapolator, which then burns off all light hydro-carbons.

The remaining brine is then flushed through pipes to a brine pond, free of any hydrocarbons. The operation is reversed as inventory fluctuates based on market demand.

Keith Jannise, owner of the Saw Creek Mobile Home Park, wanted Targa officials to assure him that the evaporation vapors and spillover spray from the pond would not affect his tenants and home-owners.

“We don’t believe that there is any substantial spray, even at 70 miles per hour, that would reach over the levee and affect the nearby residents,” Applegate said, noting that winds would have to come from the north at a sustained speed to cause overspray toward the neighborhood.

Applegate showed statistics that prevailing winds blow in from the southeast 67 percent of the time.

Jannise was not impressed.

“All I can tell you is we have a lot of families and a lot of homes that are going to be affected by this,” Jannise said, holding a rusted lock in his hand. “I just bought this a year ago, and look at it. This is what your brine pits cause; all this corrosion comes from your operation. My property is getting slowly destroyed while your company is getting rich. That’s not right.”

Andrew Laney, a local attorney who drafted the original charter that created the city of Mont Belvieu, addressed the Targa representatives.

“Gentlemen, you have a credibility problem,” Laney said. “Perhaps it was before your time, but the company that has been at that site has a history of being untruthful.”

Laney told of past events where his firm hired analysts to test the grounds of Warren Petroleum, Targa’s predecessor at the site, to prove that claims of small hydrocarbon releases into the soil were understated.

Laney said the test results showed the amount to actually be 14,000 times the amount Warren claimed.

Darrel Reid of Targa told Laney the land was purchased and zoned for industrial use back in the 1950s.

“So those people shouldn’t live there?” Laney asked. “Is that what you’re implying? I’m afraid that argument won’t hold water, sir. Perhaps we should just take them all out and shoot them, and sort through this later.”

Jannise asked if any of the Targa representatives would be willing to move onto the property knowing what the exposures would be.

Applegate said after working for the plant for over 15 years, he wouldn’t have an issue living there.

Reid wasn’t so sure.

“I wouldn’t live there, because I don’t like mobile homes,” Reid said. “I like real houses.”

“That’s the problem, right there,” Jannise said. “If those were big brick homes, that company would never have even thought about building those ponds there, and this council would never consider this application.

This is a case of a big company with a lot of money trying to push people that don’t have a lot out of the way. This is more than just about making money for them, this is a chance for the city to do right by its citizens, especially the ones that just have enough to get by, and don’t ask for any more.”

Courtesy Baytown Sun


Gov. Perry and a coalition of governors are joining forces to support the U.S. beef industry and set the record straight about lean, finely textured beef.

Lean, finely textured beef is a 100% beef, 95% lean, nutritious, safe, quality and affordable beef product eaten by Americans for 20 years. The production and food safety technologies employed to make lean, finely textured beef are USDA-approved, and it is produced in USDA-inspected meat processing facilities.

Govs. Rick Perry; Terry Branstad (Iowa); Sam Brownback (Kansas); Lt. Gov. Matt Michels, standing in for South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard, who is on a trade mission in China; and Dave Heineman (Nebraska); today jointly issued the following statement:

“Our states proudly produce food for the country and the world – and we do so with the highest commitment toward product safety. Lean, finely textured beef is a safe, nutritious product that is backed by sound science. It is unfortunate when inaccurate information causes an unnecessary panic among consumers.

“By taking this safe product out of the market, grocery retailers and consumers are allowing media inaccuracies to trump sound science. This is a disservice to the beef industry, hundreds of workers who make their livings producing this safe product and consumers as a whole.

“Ultimately, it will be the consumer who pays for taking this safe product out of the market. The price of ground beef will rise as ranchers work to raise as many as 1.5 million more head of cattle to replace safe beef no longer consumed because of the baseless media scare.

“We urge grocery retailers, consumers, restaurants and members of the media to seek the facts behind lean, finely textured beef. Science supports keeping the lean beef product on grocery store shelves for the benefit of American agriculture and consumers alike.”

Already, more than 650 workers in Kansas, Texas and Iowa have been temporarily laid off. According to the National Meat Association, as many as 3,000 American jobs will be affected when suppliers are also factored in.


A 2-year-old boy has been reported as missing in the Sam Houston Lake Estates Subdivision in the Tarkington area.

The boy is described as having red hair and blue eyes. He was last seen wearing a grey over burgundy jersey-type shirt that said “Pee Wee,” and blue jeans. Originally it was thought he was wearing his Spiderman tennis shoes, but he may have been barefoot.

He was last seen at around 3 p.m. Tuesday, right before he wandered away from his mother.

The family’s home, located at CR 2901, is approximately 100 feet from a creek.

According to a family friend, the boy, Devon “Baby Boy” Davis, and his family had just moved to the Tarkington area from Virginia on Thursday of last week.

Law enforcement and firefighters are assisting in the search. The Liberty County Sheriff’s Office and the Tarkington Volunteer Fire Department have set up a command post at the child’s home.

Every fire department in the county has been called to assist in the search. The Montgomery County Search and Rescue Team is bringing canines and the Texas Department of Public Safety has deployed helicopters to look for the child.

UPDATE: AS of 9 p.m. Tuesday, search teams had still been unable to locate the missing child. Only three Liberty County fire departments remain on the scene at this moment.

Needham Fire Department is using an amphibious ATV to help look for the boy along the creek. Tarkington VFD was unable to launch its boat due to the terrain along the creek.

According to Advocate Reporter Cassie Gregory, the mother of the child claims she was napping in her home with Devon’s baby sister shortly before Devon disappeared. The doors of the home were reportedly locked.

When she awoke, Devon was missing. When she was unable to find him, law enforcement was called in to help.

UPDATE 2: We’ve learned more about the parents of the missing Tarkington boy. The father, Mike, and his wife, April, moved their family to the area on Thursday.

Mike is ex-Army Airborne and moved to Liberty County to live with an Army buddy when he couldn’t find work in Virginia. He arrived first and then went back for his family once he was settled.

Still on the scene are Liberty County Sheriff’s Office and the fire departments of Kenefick, West Lake, Hardin, Needham, HWY 321 Cypress Lakes and Tarkington.


WASHINGTON, DC — Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott attended the second day of oral argument on the federal health care challenge before the U.S. Supreme Court, which focused on the individual mandate and whether Congress exceeded the limited powers granted to it by the U.S. Constitution by requiring every American to purchase health care insurance or face a penalty. Attorney General Abbott had this to say about today’s oral argument:

“Bottom line is it looks like a very strong day for the Texas case in front of the U.S. Supreme Court. The crowds outside the court seemed to echo that – there were robust, large, vocal crowds outside the U.S. Supreme Court mostly chanting in favor of striking down Obamacare.”

“It was a very powerful day before the U.S. Supreme Court with robust questions coming from the bench. The justices seemed to largely agree with the position the State has taken all along, and that is that Obamacare changes the fundamental relationship between the government and individuals, and also Obamacare is forcing people to do something that is contrary to the prior rulings of the court.”


 

Ryan Holzaepfel

Chambers County
Emergency Management Coordinator
Fire Marshal
PO Box 957
Anahuac, TX  77514
Office:  409-267-2445
Fax:      409-267-4133

J Bar B Foods, a Waelder, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 64,020 pounds of a smoked sausage product because it contains whey and casein, known allergens that are not declared on the label, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced today.

The following products are subject to recall:

 

• 11-pound boxes of “Eckrich Smoked Sausage Made with Pork and Beef” with a sell by date of March 26, 2012, or later.

Each box bears a label with the establishment number “Est. 7066” inside the USDA mark of inspection. The products were produced from Jan. 16, 2012, to the present and were sent to distribution centers in Dallas, Texas and Indianapolis, Ind. for institutional use.

The company discovered the problem during a label review. The company received a spice mix from its supplier that contained hydrolyzed whey and casein protein, and the product label does not declare the allergens as ingredients in the sausage. FSIS and the company have not received any reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of the products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers with questions about the recall should contact Bonnie Hyman, J Bar B Foods’ Public Relations Manager, at 830-788-7511.


Just a few days after U.S. District Judge Ronald Clark rejected the plea agreement of former Liberty County Judge Phil Fitzgerald, the plea agreement for Fitzgerald’s brother-in-law, Mark Miksch, was rejected by Magistrate Judge Keith Giblin.

Fitzgerald, Miksch and former Pct. 2 Commissioner Lee Groce were indicted on federal charges in January 2011 for FEMA-related fraud.

 

According to the indictment, after Hurricane Ike made landfall on Sept. 13, 2008, Fitzgerald, as county judge, and Herman Lee Groce, in his former position as Pct. 2 commissioner, used their elected positions to fraudulently influence and award debris removal contracts to a company in return for subcontracts being awarded to Miksch.

As part of the scheme, Fitzgerald is alleged to have received “approximately $611,000 in kickbacks disguised as legitimate business transactions.”

The rejection of Fitzgerald’s plea agreement took place on March 16; his trial is set for April 19 unless another plea agreement is reached by the April 5 deadline. In the original voluntary plea agreement, Fitzgerald admitted to making false and fraudulent claims for FEMA reimbursements for fuel used to power a generator that was portrayed to the government as being used for Liberty County when it reportedly was being used for other purposes.

Giblin rejected Miksch’s deal on March 20 and offered him an opportunity to withdraw his guilty plea for not filing federal tax returns. Miksch did not accept Giblin’s offer.

“The necessary steps will be taken by the court according to the defendant’s decision,” the court documents state. At this time, a sentencing date has not been made public. In the meantime, Miksch remains on bond.


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 26, 2012
www.texasattorneygeneral.gov
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CONTACT
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(512) 463-2050

Attorney General Abbott Attends First Day of Federal Health Care Reform Supreme Court Oral Arguments

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott attended the first day of oral argument on the federal health care challenge before the U.S. Supreme Court, which focused on the Anti-Injunction Act and whether the parties challenging the law can sue before the law’s individual mandate – and the penalty imposed for not complying with the mandate – takes effect in 2014. Attorney General Abbott had this to say about today’s oral argument:

On the crowds in the plaza of the U.S. Supreme Court:

“I have been here to the U.S. Supreme Court multiple times and I’ve never seen crowds like this. The entire plaza around the Supreme Court is completely crowded with protestors against Obamacare and with supporters of Obamacare. This shows that this law is something that has gripped the entire nation. Most people here want to see Obamacare overturned.”

U.S. Supreme Court link to audio and transcript of today’s oral arguments

On the issues covered in today’s oral argument:

“The issue is whether or not this is or is not a tax. The truth of the matter is, this is imposed as a penalty, not a tax. The purpose of a tax is to raise revenue, and the purpose of the Obamacare penalty is not to raise revenue. As the justices pointed out, if Obamacare is successful, no one will be paying a penalty because everyone will have gone out and bought the health care insurance imposed by Obamacare. Therefore, clearly the Anti-Injunction Act does not apply – this is not a tax.

“As Justice Alito pointed out today, the Department of Justice lawyers in court today were contending that this is not a tax, but he did note that they’re going to be right back in court tomorrow contending that in fact this is a tax – once again pointing out the hypocrisy of the Obama Administration position.


2012 Best Fishing Days

  • January 1–9
  • January 23–February 7
  • February 21–March 8
  • March 22–April 6
  • April 21–May 5
  • May 20–June 4
  • June 19–July 3
  • July 19–August 1
  • August 17–31
  • September 15–29
  • October 15–29
  • November 13–28
  • December 13–28

For your customized Moon times, see our Moon Phase Calendar.

The Sun, Moon, tides, and weather all influence fish activity. For example, fish tend to feed more at sunrise and sunset. During a full moon, tides are higher than average and fish tend to feed more.

However, most of us go fishing when we can get the time off, not because it is the best time!

Best Times for Fishing

  • One hour before and one hour after high tides, and one hour before and one hour after low tides. Inland, the times for high tides correspond with the times when the Moon is due south. Low tides are halfway between high tides.
     
  • During the “morning rise” (after sunup for a spell) and the “evening rise” (just before sundown and the hour or so after).
     
  • When the barometer is steady or on the rise. (But even during stormy periods, the fish aren’t going to give up feeding. The smart fisherman will find just the right bait.)
     
  • When there is a hatch of flies—caddis flies or mayflies, commonly. (The fisherman will have to match his fly with the hatching flies or go fishless.)
     
  • When the breeze is from a westerly quarter rather than from the north or east.
     
  • When the water is still or rippled, rather than during a wind.

Tackle-Box Checklist

  • Fishing line
  • Bobbers
  • Swivels, to keep fishing line from twisting
  • Leaders
  • Sinkers
  • Different sizes of hooks
  • Pliers, to help remove hooks
  • Stringer, to hold all the fish you catch
  • Sharp knife
  • Ruler/scale
  • Flashlight
  • First-aid kit
  • Insect repellent
  • Sunscreen
  • Unscented soap to wash your hands before handling bait. –suggested by Jerry Buerge
Visit http://www.almanac.com/best-fishing-days for more useful information!

The Old River-Winfree Founders Day 2012 Kick-Off Meeting is set for March 26, 2012, 6:30 p.m. at the City of Old River-Winfree Complex.

Volunteers are needed.  We have a place for you!!

 

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