Archive for February, 2012



February 28, 2012

By Texas Comptroller Susan Combs

February 24, 2012, was an important day for Texas landowners, and for all Texans who care about property rights. On that day, the Supreme Court of Texas issued its opinion in a case called Edwards Aquifer Authority and the State of Texas v. Burrell Day and Joel McDaniel. The court spoke definitively to an issue of enormous importance to all landowners: their right to use the waters under their properties.

As a fourth-generation West Texas rancher myself, I know full well how important that water can be, and what it would feel like if a government agency told you that you couldn’t use the water under your own land.

But too often, that’s just what happens. Conservation goals that could be accomplished with open communication and negotiation between agricultural producers and Texas’ water districts are pursued by administrative edict instead.

I’ve been concerned with this issue for a very a long time. As a legislator in 1995, with the late Senator Teel Bivins, I wrote and passed the Texas Private Real Property Rights Preservation Act, a law that has been called “a basic charter for the protection of private real property rights in Texas.”

The act specifically defined real property as including groundwater rights — rights that shouldn’t be taken away without just compensation.

When government regulations limit your ability to use your land as productively as you can, they’ve cut its value. And when they devalue your land, it’s called a “taking.” Article I of the Texas Constitution says it clearly:

“No person’s property shall be taken, damaged, or destroyed for or applied to public use without adequate compensation being made.” 

It’s a bedrock principle of our state.

It was the issue before the Supreme Court in the Day case: “Whether land ownership includes an interest in groundwater in place that cannot be taken for public use without adequate compensation” as guaranteed by the Constitution?

The Court looked at how the Edwards Aquifer Authority issues permits based on “the amount of beneficial use” a person’s groundwater has been put to in the past. The Authority was using a “use it or lose it” approach to groundwater ownership based on regulations that say, in effect, that landowners can be deprived of nearly all use of their groundwater simply because they hadn’t used it before.

That’s why I was pleased to file an amicus brief in the case, and even more pleased to learn that the court had supported the landowners involved, concluding “a landowner cannot be deprived of all beneficial use of the groundwater below his property merely because he did not use it during an historical period.”

Now the Supreme Court has set it in stone: you have an ownership interest to the water under your land, just as you do oil or gas. And if state or local authorities want to interfere with your constitutionally protected rights, they have to pay you for it.

This opinion was critical to ensuring the stability of land titles and market value of lands and to the continued sustainability of investments made by communities across the state in acquiring groundwater rights from landowners to support the water supply needs of their growing economies.

As Texas’ population growth continues its breakneck pace, greater demands inevitably will be placed on our precious water resources. These will have to be managed wisely and well through a shared responsibility. But if we ignore private property rights, we’ve lost a fundamental part of what makes Texas what it is.

Fortunately, it looks like we’re staying on the right path.

Susan Combs is Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. For more information on government regulation and Texas property rights, please visit the Comptroller’s Keeping Texas First website at www.KeepingTexasFirst.org.


Friday, February 24, 2012  •  Austin, Texas  •  Proclamation

I, RICK PERRY, Governor of the State of Texas, issued an Emergency Disaster Proclamation on July 5, 2011, certifying that exceptional drought conditions posed a

threat of imminent disaster in specified counties in Texas.

WHEREAS, record high temperatures, preceded by significantly low rainfall, have resulted in declining reservoir and aquifer levels, threatening water supplies and delivery systems in many parts of the state; and

WHEREAS, these exceptional drought conditions have reached historic levels and continue to pose an imminent threat to public health, property and the economy; and

WHEREAS, this state of disaster includes the counties of Anderson, Andrews, Angelina, Aransas, Archer, Armstrong, Atascosa, Austin, Bailey, Bandera, Bastrop, Baylor, Bee, Bell, Bexar, Blanco, Borden, Bosque, Bowie, Brazoia, Brazos, Brewster, Briscoe, Brooks, Brown, Burleson, Burnet, Caldwell, Calhoun, Callahan, Cameron, Camp, Carson, Cass, Castro, Chambers, Cherokee, Childress, Cla¡ Cochran, Coke, Coleman, Collin, Collingsworth, Colorado, Comal, Comanche, Concho, Coryell, Cottle, Crane, Crockett, Crosby, Culberson, Dallam, Dawson, Deaf Smith, Delta, DeWitt, Dickens, Dimmit, Donley, Duval, Eastland, Ector, Edwards, Ellis, El Paso, Erath, Falls, Fayette, Fisher, Floyd, Foard, Fort Bend, Franklin, Freestone, Frio, Gaines, Galveston, Garza, Gillespie, Glasscock, Goliad, Gonzales, Gray, Gregg, Grimes, Guadalupe, Hale, Hall, Hamilton, Hansford, Hardeman, Hardin, Harris, Harrison, Hartley, Haskell, Hays, Hemphill, Henderson, Hidalgo, Hill, Hockley, Hood, Hopkins, Houston, Howard, Hudspeth, Hunt, Hutchinson, kion, Jack, Jackson, Jasper, Jeff Davis, Jefferson, Jim Hogg, Jim V/ells, Johnson, Jones, Karnes, Kaufman, Kendall, Kenedy, Kent, Kerr, Kimble, King, Kinney, Kleberg, Knox, LaSalle, Lamb, Lampasas, Lavaca, Lee, Leon, Liberty, Limestone, Lipscomb, Live Oak, Llano, Loving, Lubbock, Lynn, Madison, Marion, Martin, Mason, Matagorda, Maverick, McCulloch, Mclennan, McMullen, Medina, Menard, Midland, Milam, Mills, Mitchell, Montague, Montgomery, Moore, Morris, Motley, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Newton, Nolan, Nueces, Ochiltree, Oldham, Orange, Palo Pinto, Panola, Parker, Parmer, Pecos, Polk, Potter, Presidio, Rains, Randall, Reagan, Real, Red River, Reeves, Refugio, Roberts, Robertson, Rockwall, Runnels, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, San Patricio, San Saba, Schleicher, Scurry, Shackelford, Shelby, Sherman, Smith, Somervell, Starr, Stephens, Sterling, Stonewall, Sutton, Swisher, Taylor, Terrell, Terry, Throckmorton, Titus, Tom Green, Travis, Trinity, Tyler, Upshur, Upton, Uvalde, Val Verde, YanZandt, Victoria,’Walker, ‘Waller,’Ward, Washington, Webb, ‘Wharton, Wheeler, ‘Wichita, ‘Wilbarger, Willacy, Williamson, Wilson, Winkler,’Wise,’Wood, Yoakum, Young, Zapata and Zavala.

THEREFORE, in accordance with the authority vested in me by Section 418.014 of the Texas Government Code, I do hereby renew the disaster proclamation and direct that all necessary measures, both public and private as authorized under Section 418.017 of the code, be implemented to meet that threat.

As provided in Section 418.016 of the code, all rules and regulations that may inhibit or prevent prompt response to this threat are suspended for the duration of the state of disaster.

In accordance with the statutory requirements, copies of this proclamation shall be filed with the applicable authorities.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto signed my name and have officially caused the Seal of State to be affixed at my Office in the City of Austin, Texas, this the 24th day of February, 2012.

RICK PERRY
Governor of Texas


Friday, February 24, 2012  •  Austin, Texas  •  Proclamation

I, RICK PERRY, Governor of the State of Texas, issued an Emergency Disaster Proclamation on December 21, 2010, as extreme fire hazard posed a threat of imminent disaster in specified counties in Texas.

WHEREAS, high frontal winds and dry conditions continue to fuel fire hazards that create a threat of disaster for the people of Texas; and

WHEREAS, the state of disaster includes the counties of Andrews, Armstrong, Bailey, Bandera, Baylor, Borden, Brewster, Briscoe, Brown, Callahan, Carson, Castro, Childress, Cochran, Coke, Coleman, Collingsworth, Concho, Cottle, Crane, Crockett, Crosby, Culberson, Dallam, Dawson, Deaf Smith, Dickens, Dimmit, Donley, Duval, Eastland, Ector, Edwards, El Paso, Fisher, Floyd, Foard, Frio, Gaines, Garza, Gillespie, Glasscock, Gray, Hale, Hall, Hansford, Hardeman, Hartley, Haskell, Hemphill, Hockley, Howard, Hudspeth, Hutchinson, Irion, Jeff Davis, Jones, Kent, Kerr, Kimble, King, Kinney, Knox, LaSalle, Lamb, Lipscomb, Loving, Lubbock, Lynn, Martin, Mason, Maverick, McCulloch, McMullen, Medina, Menard, Midland, Mitchell, Moore, Motley, Nolan, Ochiltree, Oldham, Parmer, Pecos, Potter, Presidio, Randall, Reagan, Real, Reeves, Roberts, Runnels, Schleicher, Scurry, Shackelford, Sherman, Stephens, Sterling, Stonewall, Sutton, Swisher, Taylor, Terrell, Terry, Throckmorton, Tom Green, Upton, Uvalde, Val Verde, Ward, Webb, Wheeler, Wilbarger, Winkler, Yoakum, and Zavala.

THEREFORE, in accordance with the authority vested in me by Section 418.014 of the Texas Government Code, I do hereby renew the disaster proclamation and direct that all necessary measures, both public and private as authorized under Section 418.017 of the code, be implemented to meet that disaster.

As provided in Section 418.016 ofthe code, all rules and regulations that may inhibit or prevent prompt response to this threat are suspended for the duration of the state of disaster.

In accordance with the statutory requirements, copies of this proclamation shall be filed with the applicable authorities.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto signed my name and have officially caused the Seal of State to be affixed at my Office in the City of Austin, Texas, this the 24th day of February, 2012.

RICK PERRY
Governor of Texas


 

 

 

 

 


February 2, 2012 – February 16, 2012

The following is a brief, partial recap of incidents reported by the Chambers County Sheriff’s Office.   General locations are listed rather than specific addresses.

Saturday, Feb. 4

11:00 a.m. – Civil Matter/Standby #9 Rd, Wallisville

 

12:20 p.m. – Assault /Family Violence 7000 block FM 2354, Beach City

6:21 p.m. – Welfare Concern Bailey Rd, Anahuac

8:20 p.m. – Stray Livestock Harmon Rd, Hankamer; horses put up.

11:33 p.m. – Minor Accident Willcox @ S Galveston, Anahuac; blue form issued.

11:36 p.m. – DWI -Felony on Greenwood; 1 arrested

Sunday, Feb. 5

3:02 a.m. – Public Intoxication, I-10 EB 817 MM; 1Male jailed.

8:22 a.m. – Assist Other Agency (EMS full arrest) in the 1400 block East Palm, Winnie

11:16 a.m. – Criminal Mischief, Oak & S Main, Anahuac

4:06 p.m. – Alarms in the 2500 block FM 565, Baytown; secure ground level.

8:09 p.m. – Animal Nuisance in the 7900 block Pelican Ln.; dogs barking.

10:14 p.m. – Assault/Family Violence, Trinity Bay RV; settled by separation.

Monday, Feb. 6

8:00 a.m. – Burglary of a coin operated machine, 5500 block FM 565 South, Cove; dryers in laundry room were vandalized.

9:02 a.m. – Burglary of a residence/unlawful entry, 21600 I-10 North Service Rd, Hankamer; saddle was reported stolen.

10:00 a.m. – Alarms 7900 block Swan Lane, Baytown; appeared secure ground level.

10:18 a.m. – Alarms 12500 I-10, Baytown; owner on scene building secure.

11:00 a.m. – Theft-felony 16900 block CR 401, Old River; welding machine was reported stolen.

12:02 p.m. – Lost property, Oak Island; case card needed.

3:30 p.m. – Suspicious Activity on Wilham, Anahuac; trucks rutting up property, settled between landowner and subjects.

3:34 p.m. – Suspicious Activity on Van Ostrand.

4:14 p.m. – Identity Theft; someone had used their SSN to file income tax.

4:20 p.m. – Disturbance on Lake Charlotte Rd.; 1 female transported to San Jacinto.

6:32 p.m. – Possession of an unlawful weapon on Speights Rd.; 1 male jailed (sawed off shot gun).

8:00 p.m. – Motor Assist on Belton Lane; subject locked out of vehicle.

8:13 p.m. – Assault/Family Violence, 15000 block Jim Branch, Old River; settled by separation.

9:13 p.m. – Alarms, 200 block Spur 15; false-having problems with alarm.

11:30 p.m. – Stray livestock on Fm 1406; owner notified and cows put up.

Tuesday, Feb. 7

10:00 a.m. – Information call reporting sign stolen in the 11000 block I-10, Baytown.

10:12 a.m. – Deceased person in the 1300 block Thibodeaux, Winnie.

11:25 a.m. – Juvenile problems Anahuac High School.

1:12 p.m. – Narcotic drug violation-misdemeanor, 1200 block Hwy 124, Winnie; case card for theft.

4:06 p.m. – Theft-misdemeanor/class C; Sonic in Winnie reported 2 counterfeit bills.

5:04 p.m. – Minor accident on 124, Winnie.

7:34 p.m. – Major accident I-10 @ 99 WB.

8:12 p.m. – Disturbance in the 1600 block Campbell Rd.; settled by separation.

Wednesday, Feb. 8

1:13 a.m. – Traffic Offences, Fm 2354, Beach City; 1 male jailed.

5:15 a.m. – Burglary of a motor vehicle, Horn Ct.; reported vehicle broken into during the night.

5:30 thru 8:15 a.m. – 6 calls reporting vehicles broken into in the Lanai Subdivision.

11:00 a.m. – Alarms in the 8200 block Lantana, Baytown; secure ground level.

12:05 p.m. – Burglary of a motor vehicle in the 5800 block Tremont, Cove.

7:13 p.m. – Minor accident, Fm 3180 @ Eagle Dr. Storage.

Thursday, Feb.9

1:30 a.m. – Assist other agency; suicidal subject at Crystal Inn Suites.

3:06 a.m. – Traffic Stop at Spur 5 @ Winnie Inn; 1 male & 1 female jailed on driving while license invalid and public intoxication.

6:00 a.m. – 911 hang-up, Wallisville Liberty Rd.; false alarm

12:01 p.m. – Burglary of a residence, Felix Rd., Double Bayou

5:16 p.m. – Warrant service, SH 146, Mont Belvieu; 1 male jailed

5:30 p.m. – Major accident I-10 WB 829, Winnie; patient transport

6:00 p.m. – Gas Leak, corner of Belton and S Kansas; leak repaired

6:15 p.m. – Assault, SH 565, Cove; information provided; 1 jailed for interference with 911 call

7:34 p.m. – Narcotic drug violation-felony, 300 block Ross Sterling

Friday, Feb. 10

2:20 a.m. – Assist other agency, SH 565, Old River; 1 male jailed

2:30 p.m. – Theft by check, Broadway, Winnie

5:00 p.m. – Theft-felony, I-10 E; reported boat propellers had been stolen (3 different boats)

6:15 p.m. – Fraud, FM 1663, Taco Bell

Saturday, Feb. 11

12:15 a.m. – Alarms (residential/business) 8900 block McCollum Park Rd, Beach City; cleaning crew on scene

2:00 a.m. – Structure fire; behind Al T’s, Winnie; fire extinguished

4:30 a.m. – Suspicious vehicle, 7700 block FM 3180, Baytown

7:15 a.m. – Stray livestock, 563/10; owner notified of horses out

11:24 a.m. – Alarms (residential/business), 4800 block Kendall, Beach City; open door/house secured

12:14 p.m. – Theft-misdemeanor, West Magnolia; drive shaft reported stolen

6:00 p.m. – Burglary of a motor vehicle, Sparks Court, Baytown

8:17 p.m. – Assault, I-10 EB West of 1724

Sunday, Feb. 12

12:23 a.m. – Suspicious activity, 17000 block County Line Rd, Winnie, Valve shut off-saltwater

10:18 a.m. – Deceased person, Live Oak Ln, Old River

1:15 p.m. – Theft-felony, FM 1405/McKinney @ JSW Steele, Beach City

2:07 p.m. – Animal on animal, Campbell Rd, Winnie

4:30 p.m. – Theft-felony, 2200 block Sweetbay, Baytown; reported wire had been stolen

8:33 p.m.- Unwanted subject, Third St, Winnie, settled on scene by separation

Monday, Feb. 13

5:25 a.m. – Burglary of a motor vehicle, Timbercreek

8:15 a.m. – Burglary of a non-residence/forcible entry, West Bayshore; reported wire had been stolen

9:30 a.m. – Theft, Fairview Rd

12:00 p.m. – Major accident, 1405 @ 565; 1 vehicle rollover

12:07 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business) 7000 block Plantation, Baytown; secure with homeowner

2:15p.m. – Theft-felony, Hamilton, Stowell; reported computer stolen out of vehicle

2:30 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business), 8200 block Mandolay Bay, Baytown; false activation by employee

3:15 p.m. – Theft-felony/firearm, N Fig Ridge, Stowell

3:06 p.m. – Theft-felony, Ameriport, missing vehicle

7:34 p.m. – Suspicious vehicle, 11400 block Sunnyside, Old River

11:15 p.m. – Ambulance call, S Kansas, Anahuac; patient refusal

Tuesday, Feb. 14

12:11 a.m. – Alarms (residential/business) 5500 block FM 3180; business secure

1:20 a.m. – Alarms (residential/business), 12500 I-10; secure ground level

3:12 a.m. – Suspicious activity FM 565 @ Fm 1409; everything OK

3:14 a.m. – Stray Livestock, Eagle Rd @ Eagle Ferry Rd.; Cow in road

7:25 a.m. – Deceased person, Fox, Baytown

11:00 a.m. – Welfare concern, 4900 block Riverview, Old River

12:25 p.m. – Criminal Mischief, Powers Rd, Beach City

4:07 p.m. – Criminal Mischief, 4300 block FM 565 N, Mont Belvieu

4:22 p.m. – Vicious dog, 7900 block Albatross

5:13 p.m. – Assault; Oak Island

6:15 p.m. – Deceased person, 5100 block Bayside Drive; deceased face down in bay

9:04 p.m. – Motor assist, I-10 WB 822 exit, Winnie

9:08 p.m. – Major accident, Fm 1405 @ West Greenwood, Beach City

9:15 p.m. – Animal nuisance, 1600 block William Trace, Cove

Wednesday, Feb. 15

12:13 a.m. – Alarms ( residential/business), 12500 block I-10, showroom motion/secure ground level

1:04 a.m. – Assist other agency 22700 block I-10; 1 male jailed

3:09 a.m. – Motor assist, I-10 WB 820 MM; assistance provided

5:10 a.m. – Deceased person, FM 1663; attended death

10:22 a.m. – Fraud/identity theft, 8000 block Pinewood Court

Thursday, Feb. 16

1:15 a.m. – DWI-misdemeanor, 826 I-10 WB, Winnie; vehicle traveling wrong direction on interstate, 1 jailed, driving while license suspended

5:28 a.m. – Major accident, Hwy 65/FM 1663; 18 wheeler flipped, leaking fuel; HWY 61 shut down for a few hours

10:00 a.m. – Burglary of a residence/unlawful entry, 1500 block Diamond Way, Cove

4:15 p.m. – Animal call, Sunnyside, Old River; dog taken into custody

6:04 p.m. – Violation of protective order, S FM 565, Cove; 1 male jailed

8:14 p.m. – Major accident, 807 WB; 2 vehicle accident, 3 transported to Bayside

8:17 p.m. – Unwanted subject, 10000 block Country Squire Blvd; settled by separation

9:15 p.m. – Theft, Elm, Winnie; reported gun and money stolen from home; 1 jailed on warrant out of Harris County

9:30 p.m. – Theft-felony, Glenwood, Wallisville; engagement ring reported stolen

10:15 p.m. – Out of county warrant service, I-10 EB @ 563; 1 jailed after traffic stop on Harris Co. warrant & failure to identify to Peace Officer.


Actual Clippings From Church Bulletins:

Bertha Belch, a missionary from Africa will be speaking tonight at Calvary Memorial Church in Racine. Come tonight and hear Bertha Belch all the way from Africa.

Announcement in the church bulletin for a National PRAYER & FASTING Conference: “The cost for attending the Fasting and Prayer conference includes meals.”

Our youth basketball team is back in action Wednesday at 8 PM in the recreation hall. Come out and watch us kill Christ the King.

Miss Charlene Mason sang, “I will not pass this way again,” giving obvious pleasure to the congregation.

“Ladies, don’t forget the rummage sale. It’s a chance to get rid of those things not worth keeping around the house. Don’t forget your husbands.”

Next Sunday is the family hayride and bonfire at the Fowlers’. Bring your own hot dogs and guns. Friends are welcome! Everyone come for a fun time.

The peacemaking meeting scheduled for today has been canceled due to a conflict.

The sermon this morning: “Jesus Walks on the Water.” The sermon tonight: “Searching for Jesus.”

Next Thursday there will be tryouts for the choir. They need all the help they can get.

Barbara remains in the hospital and needs blood donors for more transfusions. She is also having trouble sleeping and requests tapes of Pastor Jack’s sermons.

The Rector will preach his farewell message after which the choir will sing “Break Forth into Joy.”

Remember in prayer the many who are sick of our community.

Smile at someone who is hard to love.

Say “hell” to someone who doesn’t care much about you.

Don’t let worry kill you – let the Church help.

Irving Benson and Jessie Carter were married on October 24 in the church. So ends a friendship that began in their school days.

At the evening service tonight, the sermon topic will be “What is Hell?” Come early and listen to our choir practice.

Eight new choir robes are currently needed, due to the addition of several new members and to the deterioration of some older ones.

The senior choir invites any member of the congregation who enjoy sinning to join the choir.

Scouts are saving aluminum cans, bottles, and other items to be recycled. Proceeds will be used to cripple children.

The Lutheran men’s group will meet at 6 PM. Steak, mashed potatoes, green beans, bread and dessert will be served for a nominal feel. For those of you who have children and don’t know it, we have a nursery downstairs.

Please place your donation in the envelope along with the deceased person(s) you want remembered.

Attend and you will hear an excellent speaker and heave a healthy lunch.

The church will host an evening of fine dining, superb entertainment, and gracious hostility.

Potluck supper Sunday at 5:00 P.M.-prayer and medication to follow.

The ladies of the Church have cast off clothing of every kind. They may be seen in the basement on Friday afternoon. This evening at 7 P.M. there will be a hymn sing in the park across from the Church. Bring a blanket and come prepared to sin.

Ladies Bible Study will be held Thursday morning at 10. All ladies are invited to lunch in the Fellowship Hall after the B.S. is done.

The pastor would appreciate it if the ladies of the congregation would lend him their electric girdles for the pancake breakfast next Sunday morning.

Low Self Esteem Support Group will meet Thursday. Please use the back door.

The eighth-graders will be presenting Shakespeare’s Hamlet in the Church basement Friday at 7 PM. The Congregation is invited to attend this tragedy.

Weight Watchers will meet at 7 PM at the First Presbyterian Church. Please use large double door at the side entrance.

Mrs. Johnson will be entering the hospital this week for testes.

The Associate Minister unveiled the church’s new tithing campaign slogan last Sunday: “I Upped My Pledge – Up Yours

“I am so clever that sometimes I don’t understand a single word of what I am saying.”
Oscar Wilde

The trouble with being punctual is that nobody’s there to appreciate it.
~Franklin Jones

I don’t mind going back to daylight saving time. With inflation, the hour will be the only thing I’ve saved all year.
Victor Borge

If anyone is interested, I will be signing books at Barnes and Nobles from 3pm until removed by security.

Police officers must be the worst drivers…they’re involved in every accident!

I lost twenty five pounds in two seconds with diet, exercise, and Photoshop. 

Outside a muffler shop:
“No appointment necessary.
We hear you coming.”

Sign in ‘George’s Service Station’
Glen Ellen, CA:
If your car sounds like:
“ping-click-ping” – $10.00
“click-whine-click” – $25.00
“clunk-whine-clunk” – $50.00
“thud-clunk-thud” – $100.00
“clang-thudc-clang” – $300.00
“Can’t describe it” – $500.00


February 24, 2012

(AUSTIN) — Texas families still have time to lock in costs at Texas public colleges and universities at today’s prices and avoid future increases in tuition and required fees. Comptroller Susan Combs reminds families they can do so by enrolling their children in the Texas Tuition Promise Fund®, the state’s prepaid college tuition program. The current annual enrollment period ends Feb. 29. 

The Texas Tuition Promise Fund allows participants to lock in the cost of undergraduate tuition and required fees at Texas public colleges and universities based on current prices. 

“Families can invest in the Promise Fund and ease their concern about rising college costs,” Combs said. “The program also gives parents the flexibility of choosing how much prepaid tuition they want to buy and different payment options as they plan ahead for their children’s education.”

Under the plan, families can prepay tuition and required fees for a four-year degree, two years of community college or just a few semesters at Texas public colleges and universities by purchasing tuition units.

Enrollment in the program at 2011-12 prices will close Feb. 29 except for parents of newborns and children under one year old, who have until July 31 to enroll at this year’s prices. The next annual enrollment period will begin Sept. 1, with new contract prices based on Texas public college costs for the 2012-13 academic year.

Complete plan information, current prices, enrollment forms and more are available online at www.texastuitionpromisefund.com, or call (800) 445-GRAD (4723), Option 5.

—30—


Project Detail

Return to: Report List or Main Query Page

Data updated on: 2/06/2012 7:47 AM Print This Page

Project Summary
Project ID 076203018 TxDOT District Beaumont County Name Chambers Funding Status Funded
Highway FM 1409 Project Length 4.550 Miles Project Type Traditional District Est. Bid Date 2013-Feb
Work From FM 565 IN OLD RIVER-WINFREE, SOUTH    
Work To FM 565 W OF COVE
Description CONSTRUCT NEW ROAD
Project Note This project is being developed by non-TxDOT resources. Estimates have been provided to TxDOT by these resources.
Show Project Location
Contact Information
TxDOT Contact Phillip Lujan, P.E. Phone: (409) 898-5740
Project Development Milestones
  Start Design Design Submittal Receive Environmental ClearanceReceive Environmental Clearance Definition Utility CoordinationUtility Coordination Definition Right of Way CoordinationRight of Way Coordination Definition Project Ready to BidProject Ready to Bid Definition
30% Complete30% Complete Definition 60% Complete60% Complete 100% Complete100% Complete Definition
Target Date 06/2011 12/2011 06/2012 12/2012 10/2012 12/2012 10/2012 12/2012
Actual Date 06/2011 12/2011            
 
Budget Information
Project Cost Current Estimate Amount Paid to Date
Project EngineeringProject Engineering Definition $1,025,957.40 $2,997.45
Construction $20,937,906.08  
Construction EngineeringConstruction Engineering Definition $1,025,957.40  
Contingency Contingency Definition $261,723.83  
Indirect Indirect Definition $1,612,218.77  
Total Cost $24,863,763.48 $2,997.45

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
344 AM CST FRI FEB 24 2012

...WIND ADVISORY IN EFFECT FOR SOUTHEAST TEXAS FRIDAY...

.A WIND ADVISORY IS IN EFFECT FOR PARTS OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS ON
FRIDAY FROM 4 AM THROUGH 6 PM. STRONG NORTH WINDS WILL PREVAIL IN
THE WAKE OF A DEPARTING COLD FRONT. WINDS MAY GUST TO 40 MPH NEAR
THE COAST.

TXZ176-195>200-210>214-226-227-235>238-250000-
/O.EXT.KHGX.WI.Y.0001.120224T0944Z-120225T0000Z/
AUSTIN-BRAZORIA-BRAZOS-BURLESON-CHAMBERS-COLORADO-FORT BEND-
GALVESTON-GRIMES-HARRIS-JACKSON-LIBERTY-MADISON-MATAGORDA-
MONTGOMERY-WALLER-WASHINGTON-WHARTON-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...ALVIN...ANAHUAC...ANGLETON...BAY CITY...
BELLVILLE...BRENHAM...BROOKSHIRE...BRYAN...CALDWELL...CLEVELAND...
COLLEGE STATION...COLUMBUS...CONROE...DAYTON...EAGLE LAKE...
EDNA...EL CAMPO...FREEPORT...FRIENDSWOOD...GALVESTON...
HEMPSTEAD...HOUSTON...HUMBLE...KATY...LAKE JACKSON...
LAKE SOMERVILLE...LEAGUE CITY...LIBERTY...MADISONVILLE...
MISSOURI CITY...MONT BELVIEU...NAVASOTA...PALACIOS...PASADENA...
PEARLAND...PIERCE...PRAIRIE VIEW...RICHMOND...ROSENBERG...SEALY...
SUGAR LAND...TEXAS CITY...THE WOODLANDS...TOMBALL...WEIMAR...
WHARTON...WILLIS...WINNIE
344 AM CST FRI FEB 24 2012

...WIND ADVISORY NOW IN EFFECT UNTIL 6 PM CST THIS EVENING...

* EVENT...NORTH WINDS 20 TO 30 MPH WITH GUSTS NEAR 35 MPH

* TIMING...6 AM THROUGH 6 PM FRIDAY

* IMPACT...STRONG NORTHERLY WINDS WILL BE DEVELOPING BEHIND A
  COLD FRONT.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

DRIVERS OF VANS...CAMPERS...TRAILERS...AND OTHER HIGH-PROFILE
VEHICLES SHOULD BE ALERT TO THE DANGER OF THESE WINDS...
ESPECIALLY WHEN DRIVING ALONG EAST TO WEST ORIENTED ROADS.

Thursday, February 23, 2012  •  Austin, Texas  •  Press Release

Gov. Rick Perry today issued the following statement regarding Texas joining a lawsuit challenging the Obama Administration’s efforts to force religious organizations to include health care coverage for employees conflicting with their moral beliefs:

“As is becoming all too predictable, the Obama Administration is continuing its unprecedented and unconstitutional intrusion into every facet of American life, this time mandating that our religious institutions violate their own beliefs. It has to stop. I commend General Abbott for taking this much-needed action, part of an ongoing battle over our right to practice our faiths, and live our lives, without Washington interference.”


Feb. 22, 2012

  • Fish Hatchery Closure Possible Due to Drought
    ATHENS—Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) may temporarily close the Dundee Fish Hatchery near Wichita Falls during the upcoming production season due to a declining water supply.

Feb. 21, 2012

Feb. 17, 2012

  • Brady Creek Lake Hit with Golden Alga Bloom
    BRADY, Texas — Brady Creek Lake, a popular destination for bass, crappie, and catfish anglers near Brady,  was diagnosed earlier this week with a toxic bloom of golden alga.  This is the first time Brady Creek Lake has been impacted by this harmful alga.
  • I’ll Take the Dirt Road 
    The first wave of mountain bikers participated in the opening day of Dirt Fest 2012, a series of guided bike rides through miles of rugged and scenic Chihuahuan Desert inside Big Bend Ranch State Park near Lajitas, TX.

Video News Reports

Campfire USA has evolved over the past 100 years and one council has swapped candy sales for service work helping out a state park during the drought.

Youtube: http://youtu.be/AY3cJ6R_5u4

For a high resolution download on our FTP site: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/files/video/FEBRUARYVNR_CAMPFIREUSA_.mov.zip

Bastrop State Park has had its woes from fires to floods. Now, the park is getting some help from American Youth Works.

Youtube: http://youtu.be/B3XYlpKkllQ

For a high resolution download on our FTP site:

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/files/video/FEBRUARYVNR_BastropStateParkUpdate_split.mov.zip

News Briefs

WWII History Comes to Life at Fort Richardson Saturday

Take a step back in time during Fort Richardson’s World War II Living History Day this Saturday. During the 4th annual living history event, visitors can interact with American, German and Japanese “soldiers,” view WWII equipment and weapons demonstrations, and enjoy an afternoon battle re-enactment. The event, which will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the parade grounds, is free but park entry fees apply. Fort Richardson State Park and Historic Site is located in Jacksboro just northwest of Fort Worth. For more information, contact the park at 940-567-3506, or visit the park’s Website at www.tpwd.state.tx.us/spdest/findadest/parks/fort_richardson/.

Fort Richardson to Salute Texas Independence

For the first time, Fort Richardson State Park and Historic Site in Jacksboro will commemorate the Lone Star State’s independence with a Texas Independence Day Celebration from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, March 3. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department will join with the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, White Settlement Museum and the Civil War Museum of Fort Worth to commemorate the March 2, 1836 signing of Texas’ Declaration of Independence that prompted a war with Mexico. Historians and re-enactors portraying characters from various time periods in Texas history will demonstrate their skills throughout the day. Guest lecturer Sherry Cannedy will speak on Texas independence at 2 p.m. in the park’s interpretive center. The event is free but park entry fees apply. Call (940) 567-3506 for more information.

Calendar

For events in your area, visit our calendar section at http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/calendar/



TO ALL TO WHOM THESE PRESENTS SHALL COME:

I, RICK PERRY, Governor of the State of Texas, do hereby amend the proclamation issued by me on December 7, 2009, which provided for the administration of the qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bond program and naming priorities for the designation of such bonds.

WHEREAS, Hurricane Ike inflicted serious damage on the coastal region of Texas on September 13, 2008; and

WHEREAS, on October 3, 2008, the President of the United States signed into law the Heartland Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2008 (the “Act”), which included changes to the federal tax law designed to provide economic relief to the Hurricane Ike disaster area; and

WHEREAS, in accordance with the Act, the Hurricane Ike disaster area includes the following 34 Texas counties: Angelina, Austin, Brazoria, Chambers, Cherokee, Fort Bend, Galveston, Gregg, Grimes, Hardin, Harris, Harrison, Houston, Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, Madison, Matagorda, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Newton, Orange, Polk, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, Shelby, Smith, Trinity, Tyler, Walker, Waller, and Washington; and

WHEREAS, the Act allows for the issuance of certain tax exempt, qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bonds to provide financing in the Hurricane Ike disaster area, through December 31, 2012; and

WHEREAS, the Act provides that the Governor of the State of Texas shall designate qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bonds on the basis of providing assistance to areas in the order in which such assistance is most needed; and

WHEREAS, the Act provides that the maximum aggregate face amount of such bonds that may be designated shall not exceed the product of $2,000 multiplied by the portion of the population that is in the Texas counties of Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston, Jefferson, and Orange (as determined on the basis of the most recent census estimate of resident population released by the U.S. Census Bureau before September 13, 2008), which is a total of $1,863,270,000; and

WHEREAS, a portion of such bond authority is unencumbered, waived, or returned to the state and therefore remains available to provide assistance to the areas affected by Hurricane Ike; and

WHEREAS, the legislature has authorized the Bond Review Board in Section 1372.101(b) of the Texas Government Code to administer the qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bond program established by the governor.

BE IT RESOLVED, I, Rick Perry, Governor of the State of Texas, hereby direct that any qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bonding authority that is unencumbered, waived, or by any means returned to the state shall be made available to qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bond program applicants located in any of the 34 Texas counties listed above.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the principal amount of any such bonds designated for a single applicant shall be no less than $10,000,000; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the Bond Review Board shall, under the direction of the Office of the Governor, administer the state’s qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bond program; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, as part of its administration of the program, the Bond Review Board shall maintain the official record of the designations and issuances of all qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bonds; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, eligible issuers of such bonds shall complete and submit to the Bond Review Board an official application to the Office of the Governor for designation of the bonds (and, at the election of the applicant, for designation of a person to use the property to be financed as carrying on a trade or business replacing a trade or business with respect to which another person suffered a loss attributable to Hurricane Ike) in the form approved by the Office of the Governor and available at the Bond Review Board, together with a $1,000 application fee; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the application shall include a letter of bond counsel to the effect that interest on the bonds would not be excluded from gross income for federal income tax purposes unless the bonds receive the requested designation(s) and, if the requested designation(s) are made, bond counsel expects to be able to render an opinion that the bonds and the project comply with the requirements of the Act and applicable state law; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, applicants are subject to requests from the Office of the Governor or the Bond Review Board for additional information related to an application; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, following application to the Bond Review Board, the Office of the Governor shall make designations on a case-by-case basis to ensure that each project is an appropriate use of funds under the Act; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, once an applicant receives a designation of bonds as qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bonds, the period for issuing such bonds is within 120 days after the date of designation or such longer period approved by the Office of the Governor (the “Designation Period”); and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED if such bonds are not issued within the Designation Period, the designation is deemed waived, and the amount of the designation automatically becomes eligible for new designation in accordance with the program requirements; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, within five days after such bonds are issued, the applicant shall submit to the Bond Review Board a certification, in a form approved by the Office of the Governor and available from the Bond Review Board, of the principal amount of such bonds that have been issued, and the applicant shall promptly notify the Bond Review Board of any abandonment of its intention to issue such bonds and release its designation for such bonds; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, my December 7, 2009, proclamation superseded the provisions of my March 17, 2009, proclamation, designating priorities of the utilization of qualified Hurricane Ike disaster area bonds; however, the provisions of my March 17, 2009, proclamation, designating bonds as Hurricane disaster area bonds (and the designation made thereby) are hereby saved and shall remain unaffected by my December 7, 2009, proclamation and this proclamation.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, I reserve the right, as necessary to benefit the citizens of the Hurricane Ike disaster area, to amend any and all of the resolutions of this proclamation.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have hereunto signed my name and have officially caused the Seal of State to be affixed at my Office in the City of Austin, Texas, this the 17th day of February, 2012.

RICK PERRY
Governor of Texas


Water Body Report
ALAN HENRY Water lightly stained; 45–53 degrees; 7.65’ low. Black are fair on Texas rigs, shakyheads and jigs. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and prepared bait.
AMISTAD Water clear; 52–58 degrees; 16.78’ low. Black bass are good on jerkbaits, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, swimbaits, soft plastics, and jigs. White bass are fair on crankbaits, jigging spoons, and slabs. Striped bass are fair on crankbaits, jigging spoons, and slabs. Catfish are fair on cheesebait, shrimp, and nightcrawlers over baited holes. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines and droplines baited with live perch. Everyone in a boat must have a Mexico fishing license (if fishing the Mexico side) whether fishing or not.
ARROWHEAD Water off color; 42–51 degrees; 8.33’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs, spinnerbaits and shakyheads. Crappie are fair on minnows. White bass are good on slabs and minnows. Blue catfish are good on live shad.
ATHENS Water clear, 50–55 degrees; 3.12’ low. Black bass are slow on watermelon shakyhead worms and black/blue football jigs around brush piles. Early morning bite is slow. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are good on prepared bait.
BASTROP Water clear; 54–58 degrees. Black bass are fair on dark soft plastics, crankbaits, and Rat–L–Traps. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Channel and blue catfish are good on stinkbait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow.
BELTON Water clear; 53–56 degrees; 5.85’ low. Black bass are good on dark soft plastic worms. Hybrid striper are good on live shad early. White bass are good on minnows and blue tube jigs in Mother Neff State Park. Crappie are good on minnows under lights at night in 25–30 feet. Channel and blue catfish are good on doughbait and hot dogs. Yellow catfish are good on trotlines and throwlines baited with live perch.
BOB SANDLIN Water lightly stained; 51–56 degrees; 6.84’ low. Black bass are fair to good on black/blue jigs, shakyheads with finesse worms and lipless crankbaits. Crappie are good on live minnows and jigs. White bass are good on Humdingers and topwaters. Catfish are fair to good on trotlines or juglines with Redneck’s Catfish Bait Soap. Barefoot Bay and Titus Park are the only usable ramps.
BRAUNIG Water clear. Black bass are good on dark soft plastic worms near the jetty and dam. Striped bass are fair on minnows and shad. Redfish are slow. Channel catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, shrimp, and cut bait near the discharge. Blue catfish are fair on cut bait in 15–50 feet.
BRIDGEPORT Water lightly stained; 51–55 degrees; 8.59’ low. Black bass are good on TN Shad Jackall Squad Minnow jerkbaits along main lake points and Jackall Flick Shake 4.8” watermelon candy worms around deeper docks. Good bite reported on Jackall ASKA 60 squarebills in TN Shad mid day along shallow points. Crappie are good on jigs and minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on slabs (best action mid day). Channel catfish are fair on cut and prepared bait.
BROWNWOOD Water lightly stained; 51–55 degrees; 11.63’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed Bass Hog jigs, black/chartreuse soft plastics, and perch colored crankbaits. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are good on Li’l Fishies and shad colored crankbaits. Crappie are fair on Li’l Fishies and white tube jigs over brush piles. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow catfish are slow.
BUCHANAN Water clear; 54–58 degrees; 27.96’ low. Black bass are fair on pumpkinseed jigs, watermelon jerkbaits, and Carolina rigged JDC lizards along break lines in 15–25 feet. Striped bass are good trolling watermelon/chartreuse Curb’s striper jigs and perch colored crankbaits. White bass are fair on slabs and minnows in creeks. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles in 12–20 feet. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are slow.
CADDO Water stained; 50–55 degrees; 1.67’ high. Black bass are good on black/blue jigs around isolated cover. Shad pattern lipless crankbaits in the same areas are effective. White bass are fair on slabs. Yellow bass are good on minnows. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and prepared bait.
CALAVERAS Water clear. Black bass are good on chartreuse soft plastic worms, spinnerbaits, and crankbaits in reed beds. Striped bass are good on silver spoons and jigs near the crappie wall. Redfish are slow. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and cheesebait near the railroad trestle. Yellow catfish are slow.
CANYON LAKE Water clear; 54–58 degrees; 9.47’ low. Black bass are fair on white/chartreuse Curb’s jigs, jerkbaits, and pumpkinseed Texas rigged worms in 20–30 feet. Striped bass are good vertically jigging Pirk Minnows and Spoiler Shads. White bass are fair jigging Pirk Minnows and on slabs along the main river channel. Smallmouth bass are fair on chartreuse curl tail grubs and JDC watermelon tubes. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs upriver. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are slow.
CEDAR CREEK Water lightly stained; 51–56 degrees; 2.92’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, shakyheads and black/blue finesse jigs around docks (green pumpkin soft plastics suggested). Early morning bite is slow. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are good on live shad. Crappie are fair to good on minnows. Catfish are fair drifting cut shad.
CHOKE CANYON Water clear; 57–61 degrees; 12.30’ low. Black bass are fair on minnows and small Rat–L–Traps. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait. Yellow catfish are fair on live perch.
COLEMAN Water clear; 53–57 degrees; 15.67’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon spinnerbaits and crankbaits. Hybrid striper are good on perch colored striper jigs. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel catfish are good on stinkbait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow.
COLETO CREEK Water fairly clear; 2.32’ low. Black bass are fair on green spinnerbaits. Striped bass are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, stinkbait, and shrimp. Yellow catfish are fair on trotlines baited with live perch.
COLORADO CITY 17.8’ low. No report available.
CONROE Water fairly clear; 54–58 degrees; 4.44’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon Rat–L–Traps, crankbaits, and spinnerbaits. Striped bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows and pink tube jigs. Catfish are fair on stinkbait, live minnows, and shrimp.
COOPER Water lightly stained; 50–55 degrees; 7.23’ low. Black bass are good on chartreuse shallow crankbaits and Texas rigged craw worms later in the day. Green pumpkin soft plastics are best. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair to good on Sassy Shad and live shad. Catfish are good on prepared bait and cut bait. Doctor’s Creek, Tira, and South Sulphur ramps are all open.
FAIRFIELD Fishing has been slow since the fish kill in September of 2010. TPWD has discontinued stocking the lake after another kill in early September 2011. Redfish and black bass survived the kill in limited numbers.
FALCON Water stained; 58–62 degrees; 23.13’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon red Brush Hogs and spinnerbaits. Striped bass are slow. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are very good on frozen shrimp, stinkbait, and cut bait. Yellow catfish are slow. Everyone in a boat must have a Mexico fishing license (if fishing the Mexico side) whether fishing or not.
FAYETTE Water clear. Black bass are good on watermelon red soft plastics and Rat–L–Traps. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp, minnows, and stinkbait.
FORK Water fairly clear; 50–55 degrees; 5.49’ low. Black bass are good on black/blue or green pumpkin flipping jigs rigged with LFT Flipper – concentrate on the wood cover near creek channel bends. Bladed jigs with LFT Live Magic Shad trailers. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on cut shad and prepared bait.
FT. PHANTOM HILL Water clear; 43–52 degrees; 9.87’ low. Black bass are fair to good on shallow crankbaits, Rat–L–Traps, Texas rigs and jigs. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows. White bass are fair to good on slabs and Rooster Tails. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers.
GIBBONS CREEK Water clear. Black bass are fair on watermelon soft plastics, spinnerbaits, and crankbaits. Crappie are fair on minnows and chartreuse tube jigs. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers, hot dogs, and stinkbait.
GRANBURY Water clear; 52–56 degrees; 0.35’ low. Black bass are very good on chartreuse/red soft plastics and spinnerbaits over grass. Striped bass are fair on minnows and Li’l Fishies. White bass are fair on minnows. Crappie are good on minnows and white tube jigs. Catfish are slow.
GRANGER Water murky; 52–56 degrees; 1.42’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse jigs and Rat–L–Traps in the river channel. White bass are fair on minnows and slabs near Dickerson’s. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs upriver at night. Blue catfish are fair on prepared bait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow.
GRAPEVINE Water lightly stained; 50–54 degrees; 0.54’ high. Black bass are good on watermelon Texas rigged worms, watermelon finesse jigs, lipless crankbaits, and Jackall SquadMinnow jerkbaits along main lake points. Crappie are good on minnows. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers and cut shad.
GREENBELT Water stained; 42–54 degrees; 37.63’ low. Black bass are slow to fair on jigs, Texas rigs and chatterbaits. Crappie are fair on live and minnows. The Old Marina Point ramp is still open.
HOUSTON COUNTY Water clear; 55–59 degrees; 1.70’ low. Black bass to 7 pounds are very good on watermelon red Brush Hogs around points, boat houses, and docks in 7 feet. Crappie are slow. Red ear bream are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow.
HUBBARD CREEK 44–51 degrees; 14.5’ low. Black bass are fair on shakyheads with 7” worms, jigs and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and nightcrawlers.
JOE POOL Water lightly stained; 51–56 degrees; 1.38’ high. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, lipless crankbaits, and smaller jigs – mid–day bite has been best. Deep brush piles are best later in day. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Catfish are fair to good on prepared baits.
LAKE O’ THE PINES Water lightly stained; 51–55 degrees; 2.77’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigged worms and lipless crankbaits along main lake points. Isolated cover is the key. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on cut shad.
LAVON Water lightly stained; 50–55 degrees; 4.52’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, black/brown jigs and squarebill crankbaits. White bass are good on slabs. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs around bridge columns. Catfish are good on cut shad and nightcrawlers.
LBJ Water clear; 53–57 degrees; 0.29’ low. Black bass are fair on minnows and perch colored Rat–L–Traps. Striped bass are fair on minnows and chartreuse striper jigs. White bass are fair jigging white Curb’s jigs and Pirk Minnows off points. Crappie are slow. Channel catfish are slow. Yellow and blue catfish are slow.
LEWISVILLE Water stained; 50–55 degrees; 0.83’ low. Black bass are slow on medium running crankbaits and suspending jerkbaits along rip rap near the dam. Larger rock along main lake points producing as well. Later in the day watermelon finesse jigs in the same areas are effective. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are good on slabs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and Sassy Shad. Catfish are good on prepared bait.
LIVINGSTON Water fairly clear; 55–59 degrees; 0.71’ high. Black bass are very good on chartreuse crankbaits, soft plastics, spinnerbaits, slabs, and jigs. Striped bass are slow. White bass are fair on spec rigs and troll tubes. Crappie are good on minnows. Blue catfish are good on shad. Yellow catfish are slow.
MACKENZIE Water stained; 44–53 degrees; 85.65’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs and slow–rolled spinnerbaits. Striped bass are fair to good on live shad. Catfish are fair on nightcrawlers. Ramp #1 is still open.
MARTIN CREEK Water fairly clear; 6.75’ low. No report available.
MEREDITH 97.63’ low. No report available.
MONTICELLO Water fairly clear; 74–88 degrees; 0.13’ high. Black bass are good on squarebill crankbaits, weightless Senkos, chatterbaits and Texas rigged creature baits on shallow wood cover. Flipping jigs is producing as well. The shallow bite is best early in the morning with occasional schooling reported. No reports on crappie. Catfish are fair on live shiners.
NASWORTHY No report available.
NAVARRO MILLS Water lightly stained; 53–57 degrees; 1.69’ high. Black bass are fair on minnows and spinnerbaits. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows. Channel and blue catfish to 8 pounds are fair on stinkbait and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow.
O.H. IVIE Water stained; 45–54 degrees; 37.94’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, jigs and spoons. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair to good on slabs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers.
OAK CREEK Water stained; 43–51 degrees; 14.24’ low. Black bass are fair to good on Texas rigs, chatterbaits and shakyheads. Crappie are fair to good on live minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers.
PALESTINE Water lightly stained; 51–56 degrees; 3.01’ low. Black bass are good on black and blue jigs, shakyheads and Chatterbaits. The jig bite is consistent around docks that have deeper water as well as isolated cover along points. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs, Sassy Shad and live shad. White bass are fair to good on slabs and minnows. Catfish are good on prepared bait.
PALO DURO 44.54’ low. No report available.
POSSUM KINGDOM Water fairly clear; 44–54 degrees; 10.67’ low. Black bass are fair on jigs, chatterbaits and Texas rigs. Crappie are fair to good on minnows and jigs. White bass are fair to good on slabs and small swimbaits. Striped bass are fair to good on live shad. Catfish are fair to good on nightcrawlers.
PROCTOR Water fairly clear; 51–55 degrees; 3.18’ high. Black bass are fair on minnows. Striped bass are fair on white striper jigs. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and blue tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on live shad and stinkbait. Yellow catfish are slow.
RAY HUBBARD Water fairly clear; 50–55 degrees; 1.84’ low. Black bass are good on Texas rigged creature baits, squarebill crankbaits, lipless crankbaits and swim jigs are good around rip rap also. Crappie are fair on minnows and Road Runners. White bass are excellent on humps in 17–23 feet with hybrids mixed in. Catfish are good on prepared baits.
RAY ROBERTS Water lightly stained; 50–55 degrees; 1.94’ low. Black bass are slow, black/blue 1/2 oz jigs around standing timber near creek channels are best. Crappie are slow. White bass are fair in 35 feet of water on 1 oz slabs fished very slow. No report on catfish.
RICHLAND CHAMBERS Water stained; 50–55 degrees; 3.08’ low. Black bass are good on shakyheads and creature baits around docks. Squarebill crankbaits are producing numbers as well. White bass are fair on slabs and live shad. Hybrid striper are fair on slabs and live shad. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and nightcrawlers.
SAM RAYBURN Water lightly stained; 54–57 degrees; 7.46’ low. Black bass are fair on chartreuse soft plastics and Rat–L–Traps. White bass are fair on live minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are fair on minnows and watermelon tube jigs. Bream are fair on worms. Catfish are fair on liver, live minnows, and stinkbait.
SOMERVILLE Water murky; 52–56 degrees; 3.33’ low. Black bass are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are excellent on minnows and pink tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait. Yellow catfish are slow.
SPENCE 84.13’ low. No report available.
STAMFORD No report available.
STEINHAGEN 1.29’ high. No report available.
STILLHOUSE Water stained; 53–57 degrees; 15.44’ low. Black bass are fair on minnows. Hybrid striper are slow. White bass are slow. Crappie are fair on minnows and green tube jigs. Channel and blue catfish are fair on nightcrawlers and shrimp. Yellow catfish are slow.
SWEETWATER Water murky; 42–51 degrees; 13.8’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, Rat–L–Traps and shakyheads. Crappie are fair to good on jigs and minnows. Catfish are fair to good on prepared bait and nightcrawlers.
TAWAKONI Water stained; 51–56 degrees; 3.67’ low. Black bass are good on black/blue Firewater 1/2oz. jigs and sun perch color chatter jigs. Crappie are fair on 1/16oz. curl tail grubs and small minnows on docks, bridge pilings and deep timber. White bass are excellent on white SSS Slabs and tailspins – schooling on points early and late. Striped bass and hybrid striper are good on 4” to 6” white or shad pattern Sassy Shad in the shallows early then suspending deep during the day – drifting live bait is also producing. Catfish are excellent in deep water drifting cut bait and fresh shad.
TEXOMA Water fairly clear; 49–54 degrees; 1.25’ low. The Blue–Green Algae alert has been downgraded to an advisory. Bodily contact with water is no longer prohibited. It is now just discouraged. Please check http://www.swt.usace.army.mil/ prior to planning a trip to Texoma. Black bass are fair on suspending jerkbaits and medium crankbaits along rocky points with larger rock. Striped bass and hybrid striper are good on slabs. No report on catfish.
TOLEDO BEND Water stained; 53–57 degrees; 6.13’ low. Black bass are good on watermelon and chartreuse soft plastics, spinnerbaits, and Rat–L–Traps. Striped bass are fair on minnows. White bass are fair on minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are good on minnows and pink tube jigs. Bream are good on worms. Channel and blue catfish are fair on shrimp and stinkbait. Yellow catfish are slow.
TRAVIS Water lightly stained; 53–57 degrees; 50.93’ low. Black bass are good on smoke grubs, chartreuse jigs, and watermelon crankbaits in 10–20 feet. Striped bass are fair on chartreuse spoons and minnows in 20–35 feet. White bass are fair on silver spoons and dark red crankbaits in 20–30 feet. Crappie are fair on minnows and white tube jigs in 15–25 feet. Channel and blue catfish are slow. Yellow catfish are slow.
WALTER E. LONG Water lightly stained. Black bass are good on minnows and watermelon soft plastics. Hybrid striper are good on minnows and white striper jigs. White bass are very good on minnows and Li’l Fishies. Crappie are slow. Channel and blue catfish are slow. Yellow catfish are slow.
WEATHERFORD Water stained; 50–55 degrees; 2.38’ low. Black bass are good on shallow crankbaits, shakyheads and Texas rig creature baits – target any shallow cover. Crappie are good on minnows and jigs in. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and cut shad. White bass are fair on slabs and live minnows.
WHITE RIVER Water stained; 43–51 degrees; 23.95’ low. Black bass are fair on Texas rigs, jigs and Rat–L–Traps. Crappie are fair on live minnows. Catfish are fair on prepared bait and nightcrawlers.
WHITNEY Water stained; 52–56 degrees; 2.88’ low. Black bass are fair on swimbaits and chartreuse soft plastic lizards along break lines. Striped bass are fair drifting live bait in 20–30 feet. White bass are fair on silver Pirk Minnows. Crappie are fair on minnows over brush piles. Catfish are slow.
WRIGHT PATMAN Water lightly stained; 51–56 degrees; 4.95’ high. Black bass are good on Texas rigged worms, shallow crankbaits and chatterbaits along main lake points. Football heads jigs have also been productive. Crappie are fair on minnows and jigs. Catfish are fair to good on cut shad and prepared bait.

Water Body Report
NORTH SABINE Trout and redfish are fair while drifting mud and shell. Waders have taken better trout on the Louisiana shoreline on slow–sinking plugs.
SOUTH SABINE Redfish are fair on the edge of the channel on mullet. Sheepshead and black drum are good at the jetty on live shrimp.
BOLIVAR Trout are fair to good on the south shoreline on slow–sinking plugs. Black drum and redfish are good at Rollover Pass.
TRINITY BAY Trout are good for drifters working pods of shad and mullet on Bass Assassins, Trout Killers and Sand Eels. Redfish are good at the spillway on crabs and mullet.
EAST GALVESTON BAY Trout are fair to good on the north shoreline on Corkies and MirrOlures. Whiting and sand trout are good on the edge of the Intracoastal on fresh shrimp.
WEST GALVESTON BAY Trout are fair on the mud and shell on MirrOlures and Corkies in the afternoon. Sheepshead, redfish and black drum are good at the jetty on shrimp and crabs.
TEXAS CITY Whiting and sand trout are fair to good on shrimp from the piers. Redfish are fair in Moses Lake on the falling tide on crabs and shrimp.
FREEPORT Sand trout and sheepshead are good on live shrimp on the reefs. Redfish are fair to good at San Luis pass on cracked blue crabs.
EAST MATAGORDA BAY Trout are fair for drifters on live shrimp and plastics over humps and scattered shell. Redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on crabs and mullet.
WEST MATAGORDA BAY Redfish are fair to good on the south shoreline in the guts and bayous. Trout are fair in the guts for waders tossing plastics and Corkies.
PORT O’CONNOR Trout and redfish are fair on soft plastics on the edge of muddy channels. Redfish are good at the mouths of drains. Sheepshead are good at the jetty on shrimp.
ROCKPORT Trout are fair on the edge of the ICW on glow DOA Shrimp. Redfish are fair to good in the holes on the Estes Flats on mullet and shrimp.
PORT ARANSAS Sheepshead are good at the jetty on live shrimp. Redfish and black drum are good in the channels on crabs.
CORPUS CHRISTI Trout are fair on the King Ranch shoreline on Gulps and plastics. Redfish are good in the Humble Channel on crabs and table shrimp. Waders have taken trout in Oso Bay.
BAFFIN BAY Trout are fair to good in mud and grass on Corkies and MirrOlures. Trout are fair to good in the guts along shorelines on Corkies. Redfish and black drum are good in the Land Cut on shrimp and crabs.
PORT MANSFIELD Redfish are fair to good on DOA Shrimp and Gulps under a popping cork around grass holes. Trout are fair to good on mud along the edge of the ICW on Corkies and MirrOlures. Some trout have been taken on topwaters on warmer days.
SOUTH PADRE Trout and redfish are fair to good on the edge of the Intracoastal on DOA Shrimp and Gulps. Redfish, black drum and mangrove snapper are fair to good in the channel on shrimp.
PORT ISABEL Sheepshead are good around the causeway on shrimp. Snook are fair in the Brownsville Ship Channel on free–lined shrimp. Trout are fair on the edge of the flats on soft plastics under popping corks.

Katy

Please help this family find their missing dog:

She answers to Katy is 8 yrs old black lab female, probably not wearing a collar.

If you have seen this dog or found this dog call Karen at 281-385-2502 last seen fm 565 north of I-10


HOW DO I CONTACT MOSQUITO CONTROL?

Chambers County has done a good thing by setting up this page to inform us of the different types of mosquitoes we have, how to reduce mosquitoes at our residence, and how to report them either online or by phone.

As ditches are still full of water in Woodland Acres, this would be a good time to make note of the telephone number or “bookmark” the page to report mosquitoes online.

The first paragraph of the page notes that when you call in, “be nice” to the one taking the report.   As we know, there will be times of where mosquitoes are at their highest population.  Please be nice to the person taking your report.

 

The Chambers County Mosquito Control offices are located at 336 Airport Road, Anahuac, Texas, 77514. We can be reached during normal business hours from 8 AM to noon and 1 PM to 5 PM, Monday through Friday, at 409-267-2720. When the mosquitoes are bad, you may have to call several times in order to get through. Please be nice to our secretary when you call – remember, it’s not her fault!


(AUSTIN) — A voluntary species conservation plan that will help protect the economic vitality of Texas oil and gas and other industries was approved today by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

The Texas Conservation Plan (TCP) for the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard (DSL) was spearheaded by Texas Comptroller Susan Combs with the help of stakeholders representing landowners, the oil and gas industry, agriculture and state and federal agencies.

The TCP is a voluntary plan which serves as a safety net for landowners and businesses in West Texas who choose to enroll. The plan is expected to allow participants to continue operating uninterrupted if the lizard is later listed as an endangered species.

“This is great news for the Texas economy and all the people who put in hard work to develop this vital plan,” Combs said. “I strongly oppose listing the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard as an endangered species. What the TCP offers is a way to conserve lizard habitat while allowing vital sectors of the economy such as the oil and gas industry and agriculture to thrive in Texas.” 

The FWS is still reviewing whether to list the lizard as an endangered species. The Comptroller opposes the listing of the DSL because existing scientific data is inadequate to support the listing and she continues to ask the FWS not to list the species. This past year, the oil and gas industry hired Texas A&M researchers to collect data on the species. Their work found additional locations for the species, indicating more studies need to be done on the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard.

“Comptroller Combs has proven to be a proactive leader helping solve difficult issues that face Texas. She understands the delicate balance necessary when it comes to wildlife and maintaining economic growth in Texas,” said Debbie Hastings, Vice President of Environmental Affairs for the Texas Oil and Gas Association.

The range of the DSL is in parts of the Permian Basin, a region, which according the University of Texas Permian Basin Center for Energy and Economic Diversification, produces over 1 million barrels of oil a day – which is 68 percent of Texas’ total production and 20 percent of the production of the lower 48 states. These assets are vital to the national economy and defense.

The Comptroller’s office and stakeholders worked with the FWS regional office in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Stakeholders included the Texas Farm Bureau, Texas Oil and Gas Association, Texas Royalty Council, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Texas Wildlife Association, Texas Association of Business, Texas A&M University, Texas Department of Agriculture, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Railroad Commission of Texas, University of Texas, University Lands, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Interagency Task Force on Economic Growth and Endangered Species.

For more information on the TCP and other recent research on the DSL please visit the Comptroller’s website: http://texasahead.org/texasfirst/species/watch/dunes_sagebrush_lizard.php



Old River-Winfree Founders Day is very proud of Bob and is very honored to have him as our Race Manager of the 5K Run/Walk Benefitting the WWP in Memory of Pfc Wesley R. Riggs.  Reading this article will give you insight into his endurance, dedication, and heart!

Rocky (Horror) Raccoon 100 Mile Shoe Sucking Mud Race

Huntsville State Park

February 4th/5th, 2012

Bob Botto

As late January turned over to February I was more and more excited about this year’s Rocky Raccoon 100 mile race. It would be my 9th finish if I could complete it – bringing me just 100 miles away from my ultimate goal, my 1000 mile jacket. I had six wonderful pacers lined up to keep me company for the entire race. For the first time ever I would not have to drive myself to or from the race as my first pacer Diana Houston had offered to drive me up, stay for the entire race and take whatever was left of me home afterward.  My training leading up to the race had been good too. In October I ran the Palo Duro Canyon 50k and just two weeks later ran the extremely rugged Cactus Rose 50 mile in Bandera. In January, four weeks before Rocky, I completed the Bandera 100k with a respectable time of 17:50. Despite the tough races with lots of climbing I was not injured, and even completed a 50k training run in December. I was running stronger than in 2010, part of which I attributed to the use of Cytomax rather than Gatorade and other sports drinks. After Cactus Rose and Bandera, Race Director Joe Prusaitis remarked at how strong I looked. He has seen me pretty wiped out in some of his easier races. I felt as good as I looked at Bandera.  I was relaxed and confident about Rocky.

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Unfortunately, Mother Nature decided that a typical Rocky year (cool to cold and bone dry) was too easy for me. A few days before the race it looked like it might rain. I began to get nervous. As race day approached the forecast got worse and worse until on February 2nd and 3rd flash flood warnings were being issued as it became  clear that a huge line of strong thunderstorms was due just about the time the race would start.  After the heavy stuff passed more rain was still likely followed by cold blustery winds overnight.  I’m scared of lightning and I don’t like heavy rain while running.  Wet increases the hazards and the effort. Lightning striking all around me, heavy shoes caked in mud, slipping and sliding on muddy hills, cold wet clothing – Oh golly my imagination was running way out ahead of me!

To go along with my foreboding about the weather, my body was full of aches and pains due to a couple hard workouts I had done about 10 days before. I have sciatic back problems from time to time. Certain workouts aggravate it. Pain shoots down my legs from my lower back and makes it feel like I’ve pulled a hamstring. I was having pain in my left hip that I could feel while walking or running. Just to cap it off I did a measly 2.5 mile treadmill work out on Thursday, two days before the race and almost had to limp away from the dang machine. What a way to instill confidence! Oh gee I only have to run another 97.5 miles – how bad can that get (insert obvious answer)?  I was scared to death of Rocky.

On Friday 3rd Diana picked me up just after noon and we drove up to Huntsville to check into the La Quinta (Spanish for “next to Denny’s”). Shannon Smith, my 20-40 mile pacer met us up there. Shannon was my only male pacer. My other five pacers were ladies. Shannon and I roomed together and Diana had a room for two nights. We then checked in at the Race Headquarters in the park. Rain was threatening but we were able to head out for dinner before a major shower. I picked a fine dining restaurant in Huntsville. They had a good jazz ensemble and the atmosphere was so relaxing. I took in the camaraderie of friendship as well as a hefty dose of calories. From that point on I decided to just relax and take it as it came.  

When the alarm went off at 4:00am Saturday the first thing I did was check the weather on my i-pad. I could see the line of severe storms (radar reds) was only few miles to the west and would be upon us in minutes.  At 5:00am we headed out to the starting line in a torrential downpour.  My worst fears were being realized. I was starting an hour before dawn in the middle of a severe thunderstorm. I was calm though.  Diana seemed calm.  I was wearing my Gortex shoes and my light rain gear. Shannon would be setting up my tent during my first loop with Diana and arranging my drop bags and gear. I’d have a dry place to change.  The rain would end at some point.  At the Start/Finish everyone was huddled together under a large tent.  The wait was short and at precisely 6:00am Joe signaled the start. 376 100 mile hopefuls trotted out into the pouring rain to start a journey with as many different endings as there were timing chips crossing the electronic tracking pad.

Lightning flashed all around us as we took to the trails. I was soaked instantly on the outside but dry and comfortable underneath. My hat kept the rain off my face and the special coating I had applied to my glasses allowed me to see by my headlamp and hand light. My feet stayed dry even when I ran through ankle deep water. Despite all the worry, the storm was just a distraction. We were on pace and dealing with the water and mud as we encountered it. Even better – we were having fun! Diana is a good talker and companion. I was really enjoying her company. The whole run through the rain and mud thing was bringing out the kid in me!  I can remember running through mud puddles as a kid. Heck I’m only 62.

It dawned about the time we reached the DamNation Aid Station at mile 6. I had a drop bag there so I left my lights and picked up a dry top. It was still raining but not as intensely. The course now took a 6 mile out and back loop through the “wilderness” and returned to DamNation at mile 12. By the time we returned the rain had pretty much stopped. I chucked the rain gear for a light running shirt as it was in the mid 60’s. Although the rain had stopped, the damage to the course had been done. Paths flowed like little creeks and water was pooling in every low spot. All those feet were churning it up into thick molasses. The next 3 mile section was the worst. It took us through the “Big Muddy” as I called it. In one area there was a pool of mud about 100 yards long that was impossible to get around. The mud was over the ankles and threatened to pull off your shoes! Yup! Shoe sucking mud! The only good thing about that section was that it ended at the Park Road Aid Station sponsored by my running club Houston Trail Runners Extreme (HTRex). I saw familiar faces there and they had the best chow on the course.  I had instructed Diana to hold me to just 1-2 minutes per aid station. With 5 aid stations per loop the time you spend can add up to a lot.

My original goal for this first loop had been 4:30. We got a bit behind that pace in the darkness and heavy rain but made up some time in the second half of the loop. We arrived at the Dogwood Aid Station (Start/Finish) in 4:45 which was encouraging. I had planned the 20-40 mile loop at 5:00 adding another half hour to each loop after that. Shannon was there and he ushered me into my tent. Now it was like a pit stop in a car race. Off came the wheels (shoes). Shannon and Diana washed my feet and wiped them dry. Clean socks and a fresh pair of trail shoes followed. I ate a snack from my bag and changed my shirt again. Then it was “bye Diana” and I was off down the trail with Shannon. Shannon plays guitar and likes to sing. I like to sing too. We started singing and we sang for miles on that loop. We sang lots of old country songs and songs my grandfather used to sing to me. When we weren’t singing I was telling him old Rocky Raccoon stories.  We both tripped and fell on that loop. Shannon did a spectacular three flip landing for which I gave him a score of “9.0”. At one point about mile 30 we passed a group of women. One of them noted that I had a pacer. The race rules state that pacers are not allowed before dark unless the runner is 60 or older. She called out with a twinge of jealousy in her voice “How come you have a pacer?” I answered “Because I’m past 60.” She said “Past 60 miles?” I was just speechless!

The rain returned for a while and the second loop ended painfully, taking about a half hour longer than I had planned. I had noticed the back and hip pains from the beginning. I was hoping they would just go away but they didn’t. Now I could feel a little jolt of pain with every step and my lower back was one big ache. I was slowing down by walking more and the mud was exhausting me. However – my next pacer was Angela Jones. She is a tiny young mother with a big faith in God.  She had never run past the half marathon point (13.1 miles) and had never even run trails, but was willing to run 20 with me. I picked her for the 40-60 mile loop because I knew it was critical, and that it would go into the dark hours of the race. Angela had that infectious “can do” spirit that I needed to keep me motivated. It was 4:00pm when we left Dogwood.  I was aware that I would be pushing the 80 mile cutoff time on the next loop if I slowed much more on this loop. Thirty hours seems like a long time but I did not want to box myself in by not allowing enough time late in the race in case I just had to walk it out.

Angela seemed to be talking to herself as she ran along ahead of me. When I caught up to her I could hear that she was praying for me out loud! Every now and then she would turn around and yell at me “Say you receive it Bob!” and I would yell “I receive it!” What was I receiving? It was healing from God! As I ran, the pain began to ease until it went away entirely! By mile 46 my back was fine, my legs felt good and I was picking up the pace.  At DamNation we picked up our lights. Shortly after resuming the trail a guy called out to me “You have a lovely pacer!” I answered “Yes, I know, Thanks!” Angela just smiled.  By mile 50 it was almost dark. The halfway point gave another lift to my spirit. I told Angela that this loop was my best yet. After dark we picked sections to run more carefully but we made great time. Mariela’s homemade apple pie awaited me at the Park Road Aid Station at mile 55. It was so good! Angela used her phone to text my wife Kat at mile 56 and to tell Michelle Bitterly, my 4th loop pacer, that I was an hour from the 60 mile mark.  Angela was plumb tuckered when we got to the end of the loop but she made it just fine. On arrival Michelle saw that I was tired but not in pain, in good spirits, and still running well.  It was close to 10:00pm when we left for the 60-80 mile loop.

I picked Michelle to take me through the “Night of the Living Dead.” She is a pert little blonde marathoner with more life and energy than you could pack into a human being twice her size. She is not a trail runner but I thought she would enjoy this very unique trail experience. Rocky runners slow down at night. Slogging through the mud in the wilderness with the coyotes howling in the wee hours of the morning is so different from blasting out a marathon in broad daylight on the streets. Temperatures were now dropping through the mid 50’s and the wind was blowing hard in the tree tops. I made sure I was dressed warmly enough before heading out with Michelle. Conditions on the trail were improving in some areas, worsening in others. Huntsville State Park has sandy soil which drains quickly in most areas. It had not rained since late afternoon so much of the trail was drying out. Boggy soil areas like the “Big Muddy” drain very slowly. In these areas, foot traffic was making the trail worse and worse. We had to run through the Big Muddy twice each loop. There were also clay jeep roads with steep inclines that became slip n’ slides as the race went on. Many tracks could be seen where runners had slipped backwards down the slope and had to climb up again.

Michelle and I enjoyed the night. The moon was nearly full over Lake Raven. The swamps were filled with night sounds. I walked a lot and ran what seemed “safe”. At this point I did not want to take a chance losing a 60+ mile investment with a sprained ankle or worse. When we saw runners we asked them if they were OK. Many were obviously suffering, some dropping out at the aid stations.  Of course there were stories to be told and food to be eaten. I got another serving of apple pie at Park Road at mile 75. Michelle seemed to enjoy this concept of a “progressive dinner”.  All the while I carefully kept track of the time so as to leave at least 7.5 hours to run the last loop just in case.

My 5th loop pacer, Shauna Frazier had been waiting for a couple hours when we arrived at Dogwood (mile 80) just after 4:00am. Shauna is a young adventure racer and multi-athlete. It’s not easy to get somebody to come out in the woods at 2:00am to run and walk 20 miles. It takes a lot of spunk and Shauna’s got it. The temperature was in the 40’s now and the gusty wind continued making it very cold, especially if you were moving slow. Shauna was bundled up though and I added another layer to my outfit. We were back on the trail by 4:30am, an hour and a half ahead of the cutoff, giving me the time I needed to finish the race – hopefully.  After starting the loop I noticed that the pain on the bottom of my foot that I had thought was due to sand or stones in my shoe, was still there after a foot wash and a change of socks. I knew what that meant. I had blistered the bottom of my foot. I’ve run and walked 20 miles on blistered feet before and I could do it again. It didn’t make for pleasant thoughts or feelings though.  After the excitement of starting with Shauna faded I also realized how tired I was. It was still two hours before dawn and I was trying to fall asleep while running and walking. I’d close my eyes and then open them just in time to see that I was going off the trail or needing to wade a mud hole or negotiate a rooty section of the trail. This process repeated over and over. Bless her soul Shauna tried to keep me alert but it was a losing battle.  

When dawn arrived everything changed. All of a sudden I was awake and alert. Shauna called ahead to let Diana know where we were and that we would reach Park Road by 9:00am. This was a very exciting prospect for me, not just because it was mile 95 and that there might be more apple pie, but that my friend Cathy Sotelo would be waiting for me to take me to the finish line. By 8:00am Diana was waiting at Dogwood for my finish and Cathy was at Park Road. Shauna was having some issues with aches and pains so she asked to be excused at Park Road. I thanked her for a job well done. It was a little before 9:00 when I got there. Cathy had Mexican hot chocolate in a thermos and it tasted so good! Yes I got another helping of apple pie too. Cathy had a friend that drove up with her and the three of us began the final leg of the journey. I had plenty of time to walk it out so I did. A half mile from the finish line I told Cathy that I was going to run into the finish.  It was just past 11:00am. I started running and I was amazed at how easy it felt, other than the pain in my feet. My legs were strong and flexible. Finally I could see the finish line and I began a full sprint crossing the line at 29:17:40 on the race clock!

I ran right into the arms of the volunteer handing out the buckles! What a moment! Cathy and Diana savored it with me for a bit then I went to the tent to change into dry, clean clothes and shoes. Afterward Diana and Cathy took my tent down. By this time I had really stiffened up a lot and was having trouble getting in and out of the car. Diana drove me home and I was there in time to catch an hour nap and go to a Super Bowl Party at my church.  I was proud of my accomplishment but at the same time I knew so much was due to my pacers and friends. If ever you consider running a hundred miles this is certainly the way to do it. 

Postscript: 218 runners finished the Rocky Raccoon 100. This represents a finishing rate of 58%, the lowest figure ever in the 20 year history of the race.


The following is a brief, partial recap of incidents reported by the Chambers County Sheriff’s Office. General locations are listed rather than specific addresses.


Thursday, Jan. 19

9:15 a.m. – Animal bite, 8400 block Beach Haven, Beach City

11:30 a.m. – Warrant service, 201 N. Court, Anahuac; female jailed

1:25 p.m. – Burglary of a motor vehicle, 8100 block S Fm 565, Cove

3:12p.m. – Family violence, 4900 block Riverview Dr, Old River

4:10 p.m. – Stray livestock, Hwy 99 just north of toll

7:04 p.m. – Civil matter/standby, Bond St., Winnie

8:14 p.m. – Burglary of a residence/force, 3200 block North 1410, Winnie

Friday, Jan. 20

7:20 a.m. – Illegal dumping of trash, FM 1409, Old River

11:07 a.m. – Major accident, 200 block Spur 5, Winnie; patient transport to WCH

11:14 a.m. – Disturbance, Sunset Trailer Park, Winnie; verbal dispute

12:30 p.m. – Burglary of a non-residence/unlawful entry, 1100 block Miller, Anahuac

2:20 p.m. – Narcotic drug violation misdemeanor; 200 block Willcox, Anahuac Progress

4:15 p.m. – Warrant service, 8th St, Winnie; 1 female arrested-4 warrants Kerr County

Saturday, Jan. 21

2:11 a.m. – Suspicious activity, 100 block Highland St., Winnie

2:17 a.m. – Public intoxication, Hwy 124/1406; 1 female in custody

9:18 a.m. – Warrant service, 201 N. Court; 1 arrest

9:10 a.m. – Deceased person, Lake Charlotte Rd; hospice death

10:06 a.m. – Criminal mischief, Speights Rd.; tires slashed

1:09 p.m. – Theft-felony, 1000 block N Hamshire Rd, Winnie

1:17 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business), FM 563, Anahuac

2:08 p.m. – Animal call, Chase & 124; animals transported to vet

10:03 p.m. – Disturbance 4900 block Riverview, Old River; settled by separation

11:25 p.m. – Overdose, Hunters Peak Ln.

Sunday, Jan. 22

12:30 a.m. – Runaway, 5200 block Teal Way

2:15 a.m. – DWI – misdemeanor, South Service Rd. I-10; 1 female in custody

1:04 p.m. – Assault/family violence, Blackbird, Baytown

5:09 p.m. – Terroristic threat, Weldon, Baytown; reported knife pulled on son

7:10 p.m. – Suspicious vehicle, 14000 block FM 1663

8:06 p.m. – Attempted suicide, Vitemb Rd.; transported to Bayside

8:08 p.m. – Driving while license invalid, Campbell Rd/Lopez; 1 male jailed

Monday, Jan. 23

3:33 a.m. – Alarms (residential/business), 5500 block FM 3180; all secure

8:09 a.m. – Alarms (residential/business), FM 1409, Dayton/Old River Winfree; secure ground level

9:33 a.m. – Warrant service, 565/I-10; transport to MHMR Beaumont

11:11 a.m. – Burglary of a residence/unlawful entry, 4900 block Riverview, Old River-Winfree; 2 males in custody

12:01 p.m. – Theft of animal, FM 565 at Carriage Trails, Old River – Winfree; reported Yorkie stolen

1:06 p.m. – Suspicious activity, 800 block East Main

2:11 p.m. – Assist of other agency; 146 @ I-10

2:12 p.m. – Alarms (residential /business), FM 2354, Beach City; owner on scene

2:32 p.m. – Alarms (residential /business), 8600 block Lynnbrook, Baytown; activation by workers on scene

5:06 p.m. – Disturbance, FM 1409, Old River-Winfree; settled by separation

5:13 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business) 15000 block Harlin, Mont Belvieu; secured

9:06 p.m. – Assist other agency, 1409 @ River, Old River-Winfree; 1 male jailed

11:00 p.m. – Unwanted subject, behind Al-T’s; settled by separation

11:30 p.m. – Warrant service, JJ’s Chevron; 1 male jailed; FL warrants

Tuesday, Jan. 24

1:10 a.m. – Ambulance call; Econo Lodge; 1 female transported to Winnie Community

7:15 a.m. – Alarms (residential/business) 11300 block I-10, Baytown

10:15 a.m. – Counterfeiting, FM 565/1409, Old River

11:01 a.m. – Warrant service, 900 Block N Main; subject transported to Baptist Behavioral

3:24 p.m. – Civil matter/standby, SH 146

6:03 p.m. – Assault/family violence, I-10 FM 563

7:08 p.m. – Public intoxication, 22700 block I-10; 1 male jailed

Wednesday, Jan. 25

10:01 a.m. – Assault by contact, N SH 146, Baytown; reported assaulted by employee

11:15 a.m. – Trespassing, Lazy Lane, Anahuac; 1 in custody

12:31 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business) 4800 block Emerald Bay, Cove; secure, weather related

12:32 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business) 8100 block Perch St., Cove; secure ground level front & back

1:12 p.m. – Kidnapping/attempted, I-10, Wallisville

1:15 p.m. – Major accident, I-10 EB 824, Winnie

1:33 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business), Oetken West, Anahuac; gate and fence appears secure

2:23 p.m. – Minor accident, Hwy 73 County Line, Winnie

5:23 p.m. – Disorderly conduct, Speights Rd, Hankamer; 1 male jailed

9:11 p.m. – Major accident, FM 1405/ FM 2354, Beach City

Thursday, Jan. 26

5:03 a.m. – Traffic offenses, I-10 WB @ FM 563; 1 male jailed

10:20 a.m. – Recovered stolen vehicle, FM 2354, Beach City

1:25 p.m. – Alarms, 8000 block Blue Jay, Cove; unable to get to back door gate locked

2:13 p.m. – Indecent exposure, Broadway Ext., Winnie

2:34 p.m. – Disorderly conduct & assault by threat, 1600 block Bayou Breeze, Cove; 1 male jailed

6:04 p.m. – Agg sexual assault of a child, Gold Finch, Cove

Saturday, Jan. 28

11:14 a.m. – Theft-misdemeanor, Navajo Trails, Wallisville; advised of damage to her vehicle

12:15 p.m. – Theft-felony, W. Palm, Winnie; gun stolen from pick-up

7:03 p.m. – Assault/family violence, Cove Creek

7:09 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business), Apache Run, Hankamer; secured house

11:17 p.m. – Marijuana possession – misdemeanor, Plantation @ Boat Dock; 2 males in custody

Sunday, Jan. 29

12:02 a.m – Disturbance, Riceflower, Beach City; other party gone on arrival

1:03 a.m. – Public intoxication, 22700 block I-10; 1 female jailed

1:05 a.m. – Poss. of drug paraphernalia & public intoxication, 22700 block I-10; 1 male jailed

3:25 a.m. – Major accident, I-10 EB @ 565

5:17 a.m. – Disorderly conduct, 15200 block Harlin

4:24 p.m. – Theft-misdemeanor, Bayshore; subjects left without paying for drinks

8:11 p.m. – Ambulance call, Saddlewood Dr, Beach City; patient refusal

8:22 p.m. – Road Hazard, FM 565 N of I-10, Tree was obstructing NB traffic; removed

9::04 p.m. – Contributing to the delinquency of a minor, 10600 block Eagle Dr.

11:20 p.m. – Warrant service, Harvest St.; 1 male jailed

Monday, Jan. 30

12:04 a.m. – Warrant service, 10400 block Devinwood Dr.; 1 female jailed

2:08 a.m. – Fatality accident I-10 N feeder @ 813 MM

3:05 a.m. – Minor accident, FM 1405 S of TX 99; vehicle tagged

10:16 a.m. – Animal bite, Highmeadow Ln., Beach City

10:30 a.m. – Welfare concern, 200 block Parkway Drive, Hamkamer; emergency commit to MHMR

10:32 a.m. – Criminal mischief, 4300 block Kendall Rd., Beach City; reported door of car kicked in

1:18 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business), Landin Lane, Beach City; secure ground level

3:15 p.m. – Agg sexual assault of a child, Hankamer Loop Rd

4:18 p.m. – Assault, Barrow Cemetery Road, Hankamer

6:12 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business), South Main, Anahuac; business owner on scene

9:02 p.m. – Major accident, Poskey Rd Ext @ 563

10:30 p.m. – Warrant service & felony possession, 9th St near 73 Service Rd.; 1 male & 1 female jailed

Tuesday, Jan. 31

1:08 a.m. – Criminal mischief, Albritton Gully Rd, Hankamer; 1 female jailed

6:22 a.m. – Warrant service, 201 N Court; 1 female jailed

7:13 a.m. – Alarms, 10300 block Redwood, Baytown; accidental, homeowners let dogs out

2:00 p.m. – Assault/causing bodily injury, Albritton Gully Rd

11:06 p.m. – Burglary of a residence/force& evading arrest or detention, Ave E; 1 jailed

Wednesday, Feb. 1

6:13 a.m. – Warrant service; 1 female jailed

2:15 p.m. – Major accident, Ameriport Pkwy, Cove; 1 transported ambulance, 1 transported lifeflight

3:02 p.m. – Alarms; 200 block Danna, Cove; secure ground level

5:05 p.m. – Major Accident, Fm 562/FM 2936

8:22 p.m. – Ambulance call, FM 565 S, Cove; 1 transported to San Jac. non-emergency

9:03 p.m. – Minor accident, SH 65/Dugat Rd, Winnie

10:14 p.m. – DWI-misdemeanor & public intoxication, SH 124, Winnie; 2 males jailed

Thursday, Feb. 2

12:04 a.m. – Minor accident, 1941, W of 124, Winnie; vehicle struck cow

1:20 a.m. – Assault/family violence, Jobe Wilson Rd., Anahuac; 1 male jailed

2:17 a.m. – Assault by contact, Littlehip Hawthorne; 1 jailed

2:15 p.m. – Alarms (residential/business), Poskey Rd; set off by homeowner

3:24 p.m. – Delivery of a controlled substance, S. Ross Sterling

5:15 p.m. – Burglary of a residence/unlawful entry, Wallisville-Liberty Rd, Wallisville

8:34 p.m. – Minor accident, Plantation Dr, Cove; pick-up in ditch

11:22 p.m. – Warrant service, Country Boy’s, Hankamer; 1 male jailed

Friday, February 3

12:01 a.m. – Suspicious activity, Spruce Lane; extra patrol requested for night

1:15 a.m. – Minor accident, 829 WB; reported vehicle hit by 18 wheeler

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